robin George dangerous Music 2
 

Robin has a great pedigree playing with amongst others. Phil Lynott, Robert Plant, Roy Wood and Diamond Head. Dangerous Music 11 is clearly an Eighties production, I can imagine some of the tracks playing in scenes from Miami Vice, glossy synth pop overladen with Robins guitar work.

ninebattles.com (April 2015)
 

robin geoge history

ROBIN GEORGE - ‘HISTORY’ (AngelAir)

 A musician who has collaborated with Robert Plant, Glenn Hughes, Phil Lynott, and so the list goes on, should be a household name in Rock circles. Yet for Robin George that mainstream breakthrough never quite arrived. Yes he was a Kerrang! cover-star and achieved a chart hit with the wonderful 'Heartline', however George remains one of those figures for those “in the know”, while being hugely respected by his peers. In recent times he has been revealing some of the gems from his past, this release being amongst the most interesting.

Heading back to the period between 1979 and 1981 'History' is the debut album that never was, recording sessions squeezed in during studio downtime, drummer Dave Holland (Judas Priest/Trapeze), bassist Pino Paladino (The Who/Joe Walsh) and keyboardist Mark Stanway (Magnum) all dropping everything when the phone-call came to tell them the studio was free. Add in a guest bass slot from none other than Phil Lynott and this really is a star studded session.

 

'History' opens the album, guitars stabbing through the bass thrum, George showing what a wonderfully engaging voice he had even at a young age. The song would go on to be released as a 12” single, the expectation being that Arista would follow up with the release of the album. As so often happened back then, things didn't work out that way, the album being shelved for an amazing 33 years! An embryonic, less polished version of 'Heartline' is a wonderful insight into where George was at the time, the Lynott infused 'Showdown' a heavier, yet synth driven joy, the Ted Nugent covered 'Go Down Fighting' a slow building melodic delight. However these tracks are not alone in captivating the imagination, the slightly funky 'Castles In The Sky' an acoustic hit in the making, 'Tonight It Was Meant To Be' a cross between what would go on to make Whitesnake huge a few years later and The Eagles’ accessibility.

 

Remastered by George himself, 'History' has been kept as an honest appraisal of its time, a little tape hiss and abuse of the sound limiters still in evidence. However don't let that put you off experiencing the ‘History’ of one of the UK's most under-sung Melodic Rock songwriters in his most honest, raw form.

 

Steven Reid, Fireworks Magazine

robin George dangerous Music 2

ROBIN GEORGE ‘DANGEROUS MUSIC II’ (Angel Air)

 

Recent years have been very kind to Robin George (he of 80s smash hit ‘Heartline’ fame) fans, with the guitar, singer and songwriter regularly teaming up with Angel Air to release a whole host of previously unavailable, or deleted albums - and George has more of both than most. Hot on the heels of ‘History’, which brought together a host of pre-debut album recordings, comes  ‘Dangerous Music II’,a set of songs intended for a follow up release to the album from which it takes its name.

The ‘Heartline’ single made George an overnight sensation, TV appearances and live performances  galore, however with time spent working with everyone from Phil Lynott to Robert Plant, Glenn Hughes to David Byron, it also disguised the true and respected talent he possessed. The ‘Dangerous Music’ album, which spawned the smash hit, was an album which keenly straddled the Soft Rock, AOR and Pop market of the time; synth and guitar equal bedfellows. So it should be no surprise that ‘…II’ follows a similar route. Now, nobody’s trying to pretend that the seventeen tracks presented here aren’t demos and as such, the sound isn’t always pristine (there’s even a   couple of sound drop-outs as the songs progress). Yet with Charlie Morgan (drummer for Kate Bush and Elton John) and Pino Palladino (now The Who’s bassist of choice) contributing to a number of selections, there’s also a serious Rock pedigree. Key to that is George’s guitar work, which, when it comes to the fore proves remarkably fiery and precise as it belts you about the nether regions.  However for much of this collection, dated synth sounds dominate, yet in a tasteful way which even at times reminds of Peter Gabriel (‘Computer Games’). Although for much of the album we are talking a far more 80s Pop vibe. That said, ‘The American Way’ is thumping Funk-Rock-Pop, ‘No More Mister Nice Guy’ is classy, glistening electro-AOR with a great guitar solo and ‘Red For Danger’ is a busy piece of Soul infused Pop that you can easily imagine Glenn Hughes thriving on. Many of the tracks are George working alone and as such, it is drum machine and synths which dominate, yet even here the super AOR of ‘Mona Lisa Smile’ or ‘Heart To Heart’ shine with a class few UK acts from the era could hope to match.

 

For Robin George fans this release is a simple must have, although the liner notes, interesting though they are, barely discuss the songs it contains. Casual listeners may take a while to adjust their ears to the sound quality and era these recordings comes from, but good songs are good songs. 

 

Steven Reid, Fireworks Magazine

Broke Heart blues climax blues
 
Peter Haycock came full circle in 2013 when he united with singer Robin George and saxophonist Mel Collins to return to the classic Climax 1960s/70s blues rock template. He suffered a fatal heart attack shortly after, but his swansong reveal his virtuoso slide playing was still in top order...a stinging cover of 'Lonely Avenue' and 'Gotta Get It Right' a smart riposte to Climax's 1976 hit 'Couldn't Get It Right', are a fitting memorial.

Uncut magazine (May 2015)
 
 
Broke Heart blues climax blues
 
As for the two versions of 'Bluesong' (the clue is in the title), it's easily the bluesiest track on the album and we are treated to two versions: the original version and the acoustic version, which is basically a showcase for highlighting the band's respective talents.

All in all, a highly accomplished album and a fitting tribute to the late Pete Haycock!

Music-News (April 2015)
 
Broke Heart blues climax blues

 

Peter Haycock and Robin George had worked together on the charity album Love Power, then decided to make an album of their own in 2013. The duo assembled a band of well-respected musicians to record the album with the idea to then tour to promote it.

Bev Bevan (April 2015)The Move,ELO, ELO part 2, Black Sabbath
 

robin George dangerous Music 2

This album has to be the quintessential British buffet. What do I mean by that? Everything individually scrumptious, but when put altogether on one plate, a veritable feast. Having fallen deeply in love and indeed lust with Dangerous Music (The 1st) some 30 years ago, my expectations for the “sequel” were high, and being able to hear little snippets of tracks on YouTube and suchlike, piqued my curiosity; although I was in no way apprehensive about what I might hear. My instincts proved me right again I’m glad to say (the benefits of being a middle aged woman!!)

The title track Dangerous Music sounds as relevant and fresh today as it did way back…..this classic is what it is, with its down n dirty riff. No cause or need to elaborate further! Immediately fell in love with Streetwise….rocky, catchy, great melody and structure. I Believed In You delivers a sexy raunchiness….put it this way, it wouldn’t sound out of place being played in a certain venue housing a steel pole, and I’m not talking scaffolding! Heart To Heart has a sweet, light melody, although the lyrics are sinister. Great combination; reels you in; spits you out! Cool! The American Way…. one word. Funky! Flying. And genuinely, you feel you are. Soaring and floating through the clouds on a crescendo of a cool breeze. Don’t Come Crying. Opening makes me think “Soundgarden”. Plus, listen closely to the lyrics. Did you spot it? I did! Full marks to me for that and to Robin George for another cracker. Machine and Computer Games both a good surprise. They say variety is the spice of life and both these tracks veer down another pathway. Totally unexpected, but most welcome. Ace In My Hand. 70s feel about this one which makes me want to fist punch the air. Like it. Another surprise with Stop with its almost reggae feel and sound. Clever to incorporate rock with jerk chicken. Tasty!! Tragedy…. Not to be confused with any other versions. Appeasing melody and harmonies. No More Mr Nice Guy, really like Robin’s vocals on this one. Really soothing with a soothing solo midway to complement those vocals. Chance Of A Lifetime, good, sound track. Upbeat with a nice rock feel. Mona Lisa Smile. I think she would smile if she heard this, a great big toothy grin. DM II concludes with Red For Danger and Johnny, the latter commences acoustically and then crescendos into a full blown epic of a rock solo. An anthemic track and a great place for the needle to stop.
It’s not easy to justify a collection as diverse as this, not when there are so many genres in one place, but with the staple undercurrent of what we know and love about Robin George, and that’s his penchant for rock! This album uses the medium of time travel as it cascades you through so many different styles and techniques….you have no clue which decade you’ll be in next! I mentioned the good old British buffet earlier, but it’s more than that. It’s a Smorgasbord of many delicacies and I, for one, will be licking my lips every time I play this album. Thank you Robin George for continuing to write and record the contents of your head for us. What comes outta your mind has totally blown mine!

Vanessa Campbell-Kelly

robin geoge history History
 
Definition of "History" - "There is properly no history, only biography." Ralph Waldo Emerson
"History", by Robin George has, in my humble opinion, brought Emerson's quotation to the fore....and then some! Robin George has taken what he knows; enhanced, amplified, twisted, softened, awakened and bedazzled us with his interpretations of his classics. Robin has shown that perfection can be challenged and has surprised and enchanted with some very pleasing arrangements. "Go Down Fighting", dramatic......"Charlotte Starlight", simplicity with prowess....."Showdown", familiarity.
This album is Robin George's biography; the story of his musical career, the choices he made then and the enhancements he made to those choices, producing an album that makes you feel as if you are entertaining an old friend....only this friend has lost weight, won the lottery and is generally at peace with himself. Nothing short of fabulous!

Vanessa Campbell-Kelly
Broke Heart blues climax blues

The world lost a classy, true talent on October 30, 2013, when Pete Haycock, founding member, lead guitarist & vocalist of the Climax Blues Band, passed away suddenly of a heart attack at the young age of 62. Just prior, along with well travelled guitarist/singer Robin George, King Crimson alumni Mel Collins (saxophone), drummer Charlie Morgan, bassist Charley Charlesworth, and vocalist Jacquie Williams, a new band was formed, simply titled Climax Blues, and their debut album Broke Heart Blues completed for Angel Air Records. Sadly, due to Haycock's death, this will be their first and only release, but it's a good one, an album filled with gritty blues rock, pop, and a lot of soul.

Having three lead vocalists here really adds a nice dimension to the album, giving each song plenty of variety and flavors. "Gossip is Gold" is permeated by Williams' lovely vocals, supported by some rampaging guitar licks from Haycock & George as well as Collins' searing sax explorations. "Blue Monday" and "Cruel" are two of the harder rockers in the set, each chock full of tasty guitar work, and "Miss You So" is a funky blues rocker with no shortage of catchy hooks. The George penned "The Rubicon" offers up heavier riffs and layers of superb vocal melodies from all three singers, Collins sneaking in some jazzy sax lines in spots to add a majestic touch, while "Lonely Avenue" sees the band drop into a bluesy boogie shuffle. Other highlights include the laid back blues/jazz of "Bluesong", the raunchy title track, the irresistible "I Feel So Blue", and the scorching slide guitar workout that is "You Ain't Got the Right".

When Broke Heart Blues works, it's an album that is really on point, delivering memorable melodies, wonderful guitar work, catchy rhythms, and the always classic presence of Mel Collins. On another hand, it does suffer from perhaps too many songs (10 would have been perfect here), as the listener can start to get a little fatigued three quarters of the way through, but the good clearly outweighs the lackluster. It's just still so sad that Pete Haycock is no longer with us, but he's left behind a monumental body of work with Climax Blues Band as well as this enjoyable little album.

http://www.seaoftranquility.org/reviews.php?op=showcontent&id=17354

 

robin George dangerous Music 2

Dangerous Music II is, as if you hadn’t guessed is the follow up to Robin’s impressive Dangerous Music debut, an album that spawned ‘that song’. I will try not to mention it’s title, as even though it is a great track, Robin has a lot more to offer, as is evident on this release, which due to Robin’s record company going bankrupt, hasn’t seen the light of day in nearly 30 years.

As you would hope for, the songs on this release follow the same pop/rock formula as defined the debut, however one thing is certain, with 17 tracks on this cd, the 2nd album should it have been released was going to be huge. If you break this cd down, there is a massive 2nd album here, although I personally wouldn’t want to choose the track listing, and then there are possibly 6+ songs already recorded that wouldnt fit on a LP or Cassette, so would form the basis of the 3rd album. As it is, all the tracks recorded for the 2nd album are here, and all of them are worthy of inclusion.

‘Dangerous Music’ , opens this cd up, full of Robins guitar playing swagger, far more rock than pop, this proves a serious challenge to Heartline’ ( there, I’ve mentioned it ). As lead track and I assume lead single from this album, there was even a video made to accompany this. That is a lot of faith put into a song that hadn’t even been released. That faith is well justified, as this release proves time and time again offering up a great blend of 80’s synth pop and Robin’s rock guitar playing. This release really shows you what one bit of bad luck within the music industry can do, Nik Kershaw became a household name, yet Robin never did, despite the fact that Robin was better looking, wrote better songs, and certainly played guitar better, plus he was taller :-).
‘Streetwise’ has a great guitar hook, a sing-a-long chorus and a blinding guitar solo, a great pop/rock crossover track that Robin does so well.
‘I Believed In You’ in an Acoustic led track, with some great harmonies.
‘Heart To Heart’ heads back into pop/rock territory, and could certainly have been a hit had it been released as a single. Classic Robin George.
‘The American Way’ is typical of the musical style of the late 80’s when syncopated drum beats mixed with a funk rhythm section created a soundscape on which to play guitar off, Prince was a great ambassador of this type of songwriting, and Robin isn’t far behind here.
‘Flying’ is a light pop track full of keyboard flurries and understated guitar runs by Robin, however just after half way through, we head into an amazing section with Robin playing some serious overdriven heavy riffs backed by a glorious chorus section, then we close with an acoustic section. Amazing.
‘Don’t Come Crying’ picks up the pace, a great chorus line a great soaring joint guitar/keyboard solo towards the end help drive this song along. Worthy of a repeat listen straight away.
The pop duo of ‘Machine ’and ‘Computer Games’ do sound dated, but that is mainly due to the very electronic sounding synths. These would have been great on a 80’s Sci-Fi film soundtrack.

There is plenty of musical variety on here to enjoy, ‘Ace In My Hand’, Robin’s poignant tribute to former workmate Uriah Heep vocalist David Byron. ‘No More Mr Nice Guy’, ‘Chance Of A Lifetime’ with its brilliant guitar solo and ‘Red For Danger’, a song recorded by Robert Plant,’ being standouts.
Listening to this now, the fact that this album was never released seems like a crime, this is the album that could have turned Robin into a household name, as there are several songs on here that could easily have been huge hits for him. Has this been worth the wait, if you are a Robin George fan, than absolutely? Go out and buy it, you will not be disappointed.

http://planetmosh.com/robin-george-dangerous-music-ii/

 

Broke Heart blues climax blues

The Climax Blues's Pete Haycock’s sad death in 2013 at the age of 62 from a heart attack is commemorated here by his many friends, primarily Robin George, with passion and style. This is busy, energetic blues rock which you can easily imagine filling a stadium. Is it a blues album? Not entirely, but it has a rich blues seam running through it. There’s a big, bold rendering here of the Ray Charles classic, Lonely Avenue. Haycock’s presence graces these tracks, too. His guitar soloing on Miss You So is never less than exciting. There’s a big, brass-infused song with great lyrics, Gotta Get It Right, which contrasts nicely against the smoother Bluesong and Broke Heart Blues. The hefty riff on Miss You So would stir any guitarist’s blood. All in all, this is a vibrant, driving assembly of songs by some of the finest musicians. It has a kind of blues ‘wall of sound’ drive to it, and frankly, by the time I got to the final song, track 14, an acoustic version of Bluesong, I was wrung out. If you’re looking for blues rock with drive, energy and unflagging commitment, then this is for you.


Good Blues to you

Blues Matters Magazine:
Broke Heart blues climax blues 

CLIMAX BLUES – Broke Heart Blues
Angel Air [Released 09.03.15]

This album is a collaboration between Robin George and Pete Haycock (he was involved in the first ELO Part II line-up), one of the founding members of the Climax Blues Band (note this CD I guess couldn’t used the ‘Band’ tag as the band are still going!). This was recorded in 2013 and sadly shortly after completion Pete Haycock passed away in October 2013.

It is an interesting mix of styles, as you have the blues rock of Pete Haycock shining through on ‘Blue Monday’ and then on the pacy ‘Miss You’, those hook filled choruses that Robin George does so well work to great effect on a big blues riff.

Great to hear two guitarists having a blast (check out the soloing on ‘Lonely Avenue’ amazing stuff), with the sax of Mel Collins really adding to the soul/funk sound on a couple of songs. Jacquie Williams is the album’s secret weapon as she adds oomph into the backing vocals and gets the odd spot to show her vocal strength.

A fitting tribute for Pete Haycock and one for blues fans, Robin George fans and anyone who likes a good dose of quality blues music now and then. ****

Review by Jason Ritchie

http://getreadytorock.me.uk/blog/2015/02/quick-plays-lucy-may-climax-blues/
Broke Heart blues climax blues  This features the late Pete Haycock, a good man and great guitar player and founder member of the CBB,  I had the pleasure in being involved with Pete and Robin George on what is now his last project "Broke Heart Blues" as Pete Haycock and Robin Georges Climax Blues Band, and contrary to some nasty posts elsewhere I would like to take this opportunity to set the record straight about Pete's health, he hadn't been ill for a long period and was in good health and was extremely enthusiastic about getting this cd and a tour underway and was working on the project days just days  before his sad passing.

Edits of Pete's last work can be heard at
www.robingeorge.co.uk 

https://plus.google.com/106421785254858551647/posts/Kh4mKrabGYv
 

Broke Heart blues climax blues 

One may argue if it was a good idea to launch CLIMAX BLUES into parallel existence with the current CLIMAX BLUES BAND where no original member is involved, but both bands founder Pete Haycock demonstrated a belligerent stance coming up with the pieces such as the slide-kissed “Gotta Get It Right” – an obvious reference to the old line-up’s “Couldn’t Get It Right”- and finding a kindred guitar partner in Robin George. Unfortunately, in a familiar twist of fate it became one more doomed project for the latter who’d seen his efforts with Phil Lynott and David Byron grind to a halt due to their passing, as Haycock died in October 2013, right before this album was finished.

The tragedy made naming the record “Cruel” cruel, indeed – even though a rocking piece with the same name has a life-affirming ring to it – yet it didn’t make the tracks sad, no matter what their titles may imply. So while a soft, if taut, cover of Ray Charles’ “Lonely Avenue” hits the right spot, opener “Blue Monday” is a vivacious slice of a heartbreak which sees guitars twinned with Mel Collins’ sax who also soars on the “Gossip Is Gold” blues, thrown onto a heavy riff, as Jacquie Williams joins in the chorus of the main men’s vocal clinch.

Her soulful pipes take the duet of “Miracle” beyond the pale, whereas “Miss You So” offers an effervescent, brass-bonded swing, and “You Ain’t Got The Right” picks up the original CLIMAX baton, too. But “Bluesong” that signalled Robin and Pete’s first joint venture on the “LovePower And Peace” charity action, is present here in electric and acoustic versions, in which the licks are being swapped and Haycock’s voice shines. Quite a last will and a testament for true master for those who carry the legacy

Let IT Rock Magazine Let it Rock

http://dmme.net/climax-blues-broke-heart-blues/
robin George dangerous Music 2  Robin George - Dangerous Music II
Considering the timing, it seems almost unbelievable that
Dangerous Music II was never released...until now (?!!). In 1985 Robin George had just experienced incredible success with the single "Heartline" from his album Dangerous Music. Riding on the crest of that success, George and his band recorded a second album to completion. But the album was doomed from the start because his management company demanded ridiculous advances...and the whole project got shelved. No doubt as a result of these tragic events, Robin and his bandmates chose to break up and he went on to form the band Notorious with Sean Harris (of Diamond Head fame). Hearing this now, the fact that this album was never released seems particularly sad...because there are several songs that could easily have been huge hits. The track that seems like it would have been the perfect hit single is "Heart To Heart"...this one could've been huge. Produced by Gus Dudgeon, these tracks have a great big slick sound. Robin's fans will certainly be pleased that this one has finally resurfaced.
 

http://babysue.com/2015-April-LMNOP-Reviews.html#anchor2245733
Broke Heart blues climax blues  Pete Haycock had experienced worldwide fame as part of the CLIMAX BLUES BAND and Robin George has enjoyed one of the most varied and successful careers as guitarist/singer/producer. Both had worked together on a charity project and the opportunity to make an album together to tour was not to be missed. The duo assembled in 2013 a cast of heritage musicians which resulted in Broke Heart Blues. Unfortunately, Pete died of heart failure aged 62 on October 2013 having just completed the album.

Climax Blues presents us with a rollicking album boasting 14 meaty tracks, some more bluesy, others more rocking, but all of them filled with an unmistakable trademark sound. With the added talent of
Mel Collins on sax, Charley Charlesworth on bass, Charlie Morgan on drums, and Jacquie Williams on lead vocals, things could hardly go wrong! There’s plenty to chew on here and fans will not be disappointed, courtesy of renowned mixing engineer Klaus Bohlmann.

Opening track ‘Blue Monday’ offers some mean fare but it takes a while before we get down to the real business. ‘Cruel’ is kick-ass blues ‘n’ roll, especially where the sax is concerned that blasts through oh so cool.

Third track ‘Gossip Is Gold’ is filtered through with heady and menacing riffs while the overall rhythm is punchy and jagged. ‘Miss You So’ sports funky grooves and a harmony-layered chorus, the arrangement is benefitted by a real strong beat.

We go into groove with ‘The Rubicon’, a track that features Jacquie’s vocals soaring above the band, and “there’s no coming back when you cross the Rubicon”. The mood ranges from bittersweet to fever-level, and Mel Collins coming in with a blazing sax leading up to a climactic rhythm finale. We even get a quote from William Congreve…
“Hell hath no fury like a woman scorned”.

‘Lonely Avenue’ has bluesy riffs from the outset yet an altogether more classic blues-rock sound. The melodious sax contrasts with stone-heavy riffs. We get a true rollicker with ‘Gotta Get It Right’.

Title track ‘Broke Heart Blues’ echoes in some respects elements of the Average White Band, albeit on tranquilizers but with considerable more depth. ‘Miracle’ starts out like a dreamy rock ballad and the vocal teamwork is catchy and memorable. It’s also a rather visual track that would make a good music video. Really great is the smooth sax fade-out. Jacquie’s vehicle comes next: ‘I Feel So Blue’ is rich and soulful and highlights her fantastic vocal range. There is a change in pace when the blues-guitar kicks in with a extended solo.

A favorite track on the album is ‘You Ain’t Got The Right’, a real Delta-blues bottleneck affair - Mississippi Fred McDowell would have liked this one. Real powerfully performed, with Jacquie once more delivering the goods and belting out with élan!

By contrast, ‘Oxygen’ felt almost like an anti-climax. As for the two versions of ‘Bluesong’ (the clue is in the title), it’s easily the bluesiest track on the album and we are treated to two versions: the original version and the acoustic version, which is basically a showcase for highlighting the band’s respective talents.

All in all, a highly accomplished album and a fitting tribute to the late Pete Haycock!

http://www.music-news.com/showreview.asp?H=Climax-Blues&nReviewID=10964 
World Robin George
A New Robin George "World" Record
Mention the name Robin George in Rock and Blues circles and you will hear many plaudits as to his prolific talent and output in a career that has seen him record, write and perform with the likes of Phil Lynott, Robert Plant, David Byron and not a few other greats. With the acclaimed “Dangerous Music” and many more albums under his belt, Robin George has emerged from the studio with this, his latest thirteen song opus “World”. With a sublime contribution from the late, great and much missed Climax Blues Band colleague Pete Haycock in one of his final recordings, Robin has also fused his own guitar craft and lyrical adeptness with the talents of Glenn Hughes, Ruby Turner, Sean Harris, Jaki Graham, Nick Tart et al. Crank up the volume or slip on the headphones and travel the brave new “World” of Robin George in 2014.
Keith James Sinclair, ELO Beatles Forever [ELOBF], October 2014
Lonesome Daze Robin George
Skipping Musical Dimensions
Robin George is an eclectic musician, and a most underrated talent, from his early daze he managed to blend different genres, and was the man responsible for the Techno Aor Rock genre , here Robin re defines another Genre, Lonesome daze is a brillian riffy Rock and Blues tune with catchy pop undertones, which kinda henpeck your brain into submission and leaves you humming the tune.
As well as the blues guitar rifts there are some beautifully layered guitar parts.
A well crafted song and a really enjoyable listen.
Lonesome Daze Robin George
If ever an artiste deserved more attention and recognition, then that surely must be 'local boy done good' Mr. Robin George. His new track "Lonesome Daze" is a broody yet bluesy appetizer of Robin's new album and suggests that his music has not only matured, it has that rarity in the modern music market -quality. Add to that the phenomenal artwork by Fiona Bond and you have a digital single to put on repeat to keep the feet tapping and ears buzzing in perfect alignment. On the basis of this effort, Robin's new album is going to be classy. KJS@ELOBF 7/11/14
Lonesome Daze Robin George
Living your dreams with a hole in your heart'
'Driving me mad again'. This song rocks around my head constantly; a chorus I defy you not to sing along to and hugely catchy power riffs from the virtuoso guitar maestro, Robin George. A song full of passion and anger, but is this because of a turbulent relationship? Or is it, in fact, about the destructive power of Heroin? And who is Robin thinking of? Maybe Phil Lynott or perhaps Pete Way, who recorded, on Damage Control's Raw album, a song with the same line 'a hole in my heart'; a reference to Pete's love affair with the drug. There's a myth that all 'rock stars' live a carefree, hedonistic life, but this proves that Robin has tormented, hidden depths which reached out to me through this heaven and hell of a song. The lyrics touch us all. Who isn't, as life goes by, 'living your dreams with a hole in your heart'?
Broke Heart Blues Pete Haycock Robin George

Released one year to the day since his tragic passing, "Broke Heart Blues" is what turned out to be the final outing from the late, great and much missed Climax Blues Band and ELO Part II co-founder Pete Haycock. In many ways it is a perfect musical alliance with Robin George and is a real return to Haycock's rock and blues roots. It really is the most apt and fitting of farewells. Ably assisted by Mel Collins [Saxophone], Charlie Morgan [Drums], Jacquie Williams [Vocals] and Charley Charlesworth [Bass], this rebooted Climax Blues epic really impresses, particularly when legendary saxophonist Mel Collins adds his classy contributions.

One can only imagine what this sensational six [6] piece would have sounded like on the road. From the opening chords of 
"Blue Monday", this album grabs your attention ... and keeps it throughout! The vocals of
Pete, Robin and Jacquie entwine perfectly and, when combined with the seamless rhythm of Collins, bassist Charley Charlesworth and percussionist Charlie Morgan, delivers a powerful punch.

Two great tracks underpin a strong release in
lead single "Bluesong" and title track "Broke Heart Blues" with Haycock excelling on vocals and with his trademark guitar craft. An acoustic version of "Bluesong" is also included that totally enchants. There is solid rock here with "Blue Monday", "Cruel" and "Miss You So" being prime examples. There are Blues aplenty too with "Gossip Is Gold", "Lonely Avenue" and "You Ain't Got The Right" [complete with Pete's superb slide guitar skills!].

It seems fated that this
final Climax Blues album includes a track that perfectly updates what is widely recognised as the most well known CBB song: "Couldn't Get It Right". If there were any song title that summarises this LP, it is "Gotta Get It Right". Pete Haycock, Robin George and their friends did get it right with "Broke Heart Blues". Bring on the CD release! [9/10]

Track listing:
[1] "Blue Monday" [4:15]; [2] "Cruel" [3:31]; [3] "Gossip Is Gold" [5:04]; [4] "Miss You So" [4:11]; [5] "The Rubicon" [4:26]; [6] "Gotta Get It Right" [3:16]; [7] "Bluesong" [6:31]; [8] "Broke Heart Blues" [4:17]; [9] "Miracle" [4:30]; [10] "Lonely Avenue"; [11] "I Feel So Blue" [5:06]; [12] "You Ain't Got The Right" [3:10] [13] "Bluesong [Acoustic]" [6:30]

 

Keith James Sinclair 5 star review

Broke Heart Blues Pete Haycock Robin George Roger Stephens
An explosion of pure talent
I am giving this a 5 star review as I honestly feel this is what it deserves, I should admit that I have been given a pre release copy and have played this many times.
Firstly the production and mixing are second to none.
The songs are some of the strongest I have heard for a long time on one cd with some of the most versatile rock and blues you will hear.
Pete's vocals and guitar are exquisite, as are the lovely crafted guitar and vox & harmonies from Robin
Jacqui's vocals are strong and both bluesy with hints of soul, while Mel’s sax parts just FUNK, the bass and drums provide some serious rhythm.
The songs cover a seriously wide spectrum, Blue Monday and Cruel are like cars coming straight at you down to highway, Gossip is Gold has plenty of melody and some blow you away harmonies, while Miss you so has one of the best Sax sections I have heard in this genre and boy this really grooves - if I had to choose a favourite this would be it.
The Rubicon redefines the genre as many of Robins songs do, this track from Pete and Robin is pure rock poetry.
Which bring me to Got to Get it Right which follows the Climax blues full circle and is the modern day Couldn't get it Right and is the perfect pop song.
The next 5 songs, Bluesong (note Petes fantastic guitar work here) Broke Heart Blues (with some great vox by Pete), Miracle, lonely Avenue (Ray Charles) and Feel So Blue all lead us down the true Blues road.
You Aint Got the Right is a cheeky blues/pop song and takes you back on a high
The last track Blue Song acoustic is a poignant and tasteful reminder of Pets sublime talent and a fitting end to a truly remarkable cd.
Broke Heart Blues Pete Haycock Robin George

 Broke Heart Blues is a magical mixture of Pete Haycock’s true blues and Robin George’s rock rhapsodies. The result is spellbinding. As we’d expect from the poet, Robin George, the lyrics are profound, intelligent and evocative but take on a deeper, haunting resonance, armed as we are with the heart breaking knowledge of Pete’s sudden, untimely passing.

Superb musicians and masters of their craft, Climax Blues amazes with the breadth of talent and the depth of feeling. Crescendos of sheer brilliance erupt from the convergence of Mel’s sax with Pete’s slide and Robin’s rock guitar, climaxing in solo sections unlike anything I’ve heard before. In the same way the melding of Jacquie William’s beautiful, soulful vocals with Robin’s unique, harmonious voice creates a sound that merges and transforms into something truly inimitable. Pete’s voice; warm, rich and silky, blends beautifully with the rock solid, rhythm section and the result is alchemy.

This innovative yet final incarnation of Climax Blues is a lasting and fitting tribute to Pete, as well as to the other superb musicians who have poured their heart and soul into this breathtakingly fine album.

Fiona Bond 5 star review

When Robin was eight he became very attached to a plastic BEATLES guitar, at 14 he joined a band and at 16 he turned professional. Soon he started his own band LIFE, and during his career he has played with the likes of ROBERT PLANT, PHIL LYNOTT, DAVID BYRON, GLENN HUGHES, JOHN WETTON and Mark Stanway of MAGNUM. Not bad for a lad from Wolverhampton! “Dangerous Music” was originally released on Bronze Records in 1985, and “Heartline” was chosen to be a single. But things went sour when the company folded, and a planned second album went missing in the aftermath. This was only one of many set-backs that have befallen on this talented musician. How good is “Dangerous Music” 25 years after?

Heartline” opens this remastered edition. There is something of hit pop about it, plucky keyboards and background vocals was a sure bet 25 years ago. There are plenty of interesting musicians contributing; Pino Palladino and PHLI LYNOTT share bass duties, Kex Gorham (ex. MAGNUM) and Dave Holland (ex. JUDAS PRIEST) share the drumming and Mark Stanway contributed keyboards. “Spy” is pop rock with a hit refrain that sticks like superglue. Robin´s guitar still rocks no matter the amount of pop refrains that has been applied. The thing I have problems with is when the vocals are too high-pitched, e.g. “Stolen From My Heart”. The best moments are Robin´s guitar in keyboard-laden songs like “Shout”. There was no shortage of winning refrains. Robin has always mixed his contemporaries with his personal older influences; “Hit List” does not sound like a track from the eighties. The compulsory ballad takes a while, but “Don´t Turn Away” encourages slow dancing with full body contact without being overly sentimental. It feels sincere all in all. The poppy “Space Kadett” closes the original album, a true excess in Brit 80´s. The bonus tracks are three songs live at The Tommy Vance Show; “Heartline”, “Spy” and “No News Is good News”, plus Robin´s own mixes of “Heartline” and “Don´t Turn Away”. Live they sound less 80´s neon-colored plastic and more rock, as is often the case of melodic hard rock from that era. Robin´s delightful mix provides new lease to the ballad, while “Heartline” moves up the rock ladder. This makes it altogether five extra reasons to purchase this excellent album. I wouldn´t want to be without this splendid piece of British rock history!

Track List
Heartline, Spy, No News Is Good News, French Kisses, Stolen from My Heart, Shout, Showdown, Hit List, Shoot on Sight, Don´t Turn Away, Space Kadett

Bonus Tracks
Heartline (Live at the Tommy Vance Show), Spy (Live at the Tommy Vance Show), No News Is Good News (Live at the Tommy Vance Show), Heartline (Dangerous Mix), Don´t Turn Away (Dangerous Mix)

www.angelair.co.uk www.robingeorge.co.uk   Writer: Mikael Johansson

With the album excellently remastered and five bonus tracks don't let 'Dangerous Music' pass you by as I did all those years ago.

Back in 1985 a good friend of mine bought a single with some bloke with tousled hair and a moody stare on the cover. However when he placed the 7" on the turntable, I was left with a real quandary. I loved what I heard, however it just wasn't quite "Metal" enough for me to admit it! Now when you are twelve and have a denim jacket with Kiss, AC/DC, Iron Maiden and Status Quo patches on the back, these things really mattered. "Rubbish" I proclaimed and my mate sheepishly agreed (although I don't think he meant it either). So now some twenty five years later thanks to Angel Air Records, I finally have a copy of the album that song came from. The album is 'Dangerous Music' by Robin George and the song was 'Heartline'. Of all the stupid things I have done, disregarding 'Dangerous Music' with such ease must rank pretty highly, as right from the first time I heard the hearty riff and seductive keyboards of 'Heartline' after all these years, I immediately remembered why I loved it first time round.

'Dangerous Music' was the debut album from George, however with a cast list that included bassists Phil Lynott and Pino Palladino (Peter Gabriel, The Who, Paul Simon etc), keyboard players Mark Stanway (Magnum) and Adrian Lee (Toyah, Mike + The Mechanics) and drummers Dave Holland (Judas Priest) and Kex Gorin (Magnum) it is obvious that he had already built an impressive reputation in the music business.

As with many artists, George's musical ability wasn't enough to ensure success and even as 'Dangerous Music' looked set to become huge, his record label, Bronze, went bust, the album disappeared from the stores and another great set of songs was destined to go forgotten. Although the album is very much a product of its time, the standard of song writing and musicianship means that George's smart guitar work and the wonderful keyboard interplay elevates the eighties vibe of the songs into something that still sounds fresh and relevant today. It is easy to see why he was on the verge of breaking huge with this album, as his charismatic vocals and guitar playing married to the commercial FM Radio synth work meant that the crossover appeal for his music was huge. It's just as easy to imagine fans of Foreigner being mesmerised by these songs, as it is teeny girls who had Nick Kershaw posters on their wall (George's smouldering good looks wouldn't have hurt either). 'Spy', with its acoustic strumming and great guitar solo, or the AOR gold of 'Don't Turn Away', where the keyboards and the layered vocals are hugely atmospheric and really should be in the collection of any music fan who likes keyboard led rock where the guitars aren't frightened to elbow their way to the forefront. With the album excellently remastered and five bonus tracks (three from a TV performance and worthy alternate mixes of 'Heartline' and 'Don't Turn Away') don't let 'Dangerous Music' pass you by as I did all those years ago.

Steven Reid
Lovepower and Peace Charity CD Cover

LovePower And Peace’ is an eclectic but somehow cohesive collection of songs put together by Robin George and Angel Air Records in aid of charity. Uniquely, all  the proceeds from its sales will go to the 3 charities of choice here.

George is joined by the great and the good from the UK’s rock, metal and soul scenes, underground movements all, but simply bursting at the seams with talent.At random:- Daniel Boone, Ken Hensley, Pete Goalby, Pino Palladino, Pete Way, John Wetton and Brian Tatler.

As you might expect, there are several choice cuts from George’s back catalogue, plus reworks of pop/rock standards. All in all, 17 cracking tracks.The real highlights are the sinuous, soulful title track, sung by Jacki Graham and Ruby Turner and ‘Pride’, a George/Turner co-write with a smouldering, seductive groove, liberally sprinkled with Motown magic, again sung by Turner.

There’s plenty of room too for George’s tech rock, though it’s unusual hearing Sean Harris singing his very own version of ‘Cocoon’ and Charlie George singing ‘Bluesong’. ‘Wasted Time’ is an old Asia demo from the eighties, dug out and dusted down by Wetton and George. They turn it into a deeply satisfying – if slightly dated - Tech Rock / ELO pop hymn.

Elsewhere, Daniel Boone’s achingly eloquent vocals wring out every ounce of pathos from ‘Another Lonely Night’, a song originally written by Boone and George for Alvin Stardust. But we won’t hold that against them. George’s breakthrough song, ‘Heartline’ pops up again, densely constructed in the studio with Nick Tart contributing a suitably hard rock vocal performance.

Ribboned with melancholy, Phil Lynott’s tribute to Elvis,‘Kings Call’ gets another outing, an ode from a giant of rock who went too soon to a giant of rock who went too soon.

Charity albums are often an indulgence, where unwritten excuses are made for second rate performances, but this stuff is dynamite. An outstandingly good rock album in its own right. And for the casual fan, a highly entertaining voyage of discovery.

The 3 charities are : Compton Hospice in Wolverhampton; Haven House in Essex and the Birmingham Centre For Arts Therapies.All 3 have websites. Take a look
http://www.compton-hospice.org.uk/  http://www.havenhouse.org.uk/ http://www.bcat.info/


Brian McGowan www.midlandsrock.co.uk

Lovepower and Peace Charity CD Cover Ladies and gentlemen, the Lifetime Achievement Award goes to… Robin George’s Lovepower for LovePower  and Peace, an album featuring some of the most respected artists in the  biz  - with all profits donated to several charities.

LovePower and Peace not only serves a good and noble cause (all artists,  studios, choirs, record companies and media folk involved donated their  precious time for absolutely free), it is also a fantastic trip through an  interesting mix of musical genres. From funky soul to bluesy rock and  hoot-it-straight rock, the album offers a whopping 17 tracks oozing with  originality and attitude.

It’s impossible to mention every single track, just as it is impossible to mention every single artist involved, or we’ll be here till Christmas. There  are so many gems on this album (in fact, all of them), so perhaps highlighting  those that vary the most in style is the obvious thing to do.

Opener is the title track, gloriously performed by R&B singer Ruby  Turner and Jaki Graham. Backing vocals are provided by northern soul  singer Jacqui Williams as well as Geri Minelli (founder of the  ‘Women In Music Festival’) and her choir, as well as a 200 choir from 3 schools. Oh, such talent!  ‘Seven Golden Daffodils’ is another pearl, sliding between hearty blues and narling guitar riffs. Leads here are Jacqui Williams and Robin  George, with Charlie George and Vix (of Fuzzbox fame) on  backing vox. In a similar vein is ‘Bluesong’ with Charlie George on  leads and  with Steve Hunter from the Alice Cooper band on solo guitar, backed by ‘The Love Power Band’.

It gets more complex with ‘World’ – indeed, it feels like the world  is involved  here and it sounds like it too. Featuring Freya Copeland and that flame-haired Vixen, plus Robin George and Arthur Brown on leads, we are  furthermore treated to ‘The Birmingham World Kids Choir’ (coached by
 Vix), the  ‘Women In Music International Choir’, the ‘Love Power Rock Choir’  and ‘The  LovePower Band’! And now pardon me please, but I need a coffee break…

That was tasty, but back to the album. Ironically, one of the most  brilliant  songs on it is also the most simplistic sounding one, for it is performed by   the ‘LovePower Band’ alone and without any additional artists. Having  said
 
that, there are six in the band. ‘King’s Call’ (yes, we’re talking  the Phil  Lynott classic) rarely sounded as enticing as here, with its inspired  blend of  folk- and flamenco guitar. It’s also rocks of course, though not nearly as hard  as the Thin Lizzy original – although it works almost better that way.

Things remain on a more simplistic and mellow path with ‘Tired Eyes’  and  ‘Another Lonely Night’ before it gets almost ridiculous on ‘With A  Little Help  From My Friends’. Make that “with big help from my friends”! I  won’t even  attempt to name everyone involved here or it’ll be you in need for a  coffee  break. However, some of the names are Conny Bloom (Electric Boys, Hanoi  Rocks, Jameson Whiskey), Eddie Clarke (Motörhead), Spike (The  
Quireboys), Sean Harris and Brian Tatler (both Diamond Head), Pete  Way (UFO), Mel Collins (Bad Company, 10CC), Chris Slade (Manfred Mann’s
 Earth Band, AC/DC, Uriah Heep etc) and so the list goes on.  Apologies to those I failed to mention, you guys know you’re on it and I  know  you’re on it. As for the song: well everyone knows how the tune goes,  right?

After ‘Mona Lisa Smile’ and ‘Wasted Time’ it’s on to  ‘Alice’… with raspy-voiced  crooner Spike and Robin George sharing lead- and backing vox  duties. For those who aren’t in the know-how: ‘Alice’ was originally  a track by  UK-rock band Damage Control and consisted of Robin George, Chris Slade,  Pete  Way and at one point also of Spike. So yeah, it all makes sense and stays  within the family so to speak. Suffice to say the track sounds as you  might  expect it to sound - cranked up and with seriously punchy riff work,  equalled  by Slade’s drumbeat.

One number that couldn’t be left out on the album is Robin George’s signature  song ‘Heartline’ and neither is his ‘Angel Song’, which is also  the closing  track. While the former is pumping up the adrenaline, the latter is a
restrained affair in comparison – with some lovely Dobro guitar play by  Pete  Haycock (of Climax Blues Band fame) and bass by Pino Palladino  (Genesis/The Who).

As mentioned at the beginning, 100% of all profits go to the following  charities: Compton Hospice in Wolverhampton, Haven House in Essex and the  Birmingham Centre for Arts Therapies. Last but not least, credit must also  go
to Debra Sidebotham for the artist/charity liaison.

Claudia A
Lovepower and Peace Charity CD Cover
Imagine an album that has a cast list that contains among many others Ken Hensley (Uriah Heep), Pete Way (UFO/Waysted), Sean Harris and Brian Tatler (both Diamond Head), Conny Bloom (The Electric Boys/Hanoi Rocks), 'Fast' Eddie Clarke (Motorhead/Fastway), John Wetton (Asia/King Crimson) Spike (Quireboys), Chris Slade (AC/DC/Asia), Chris Thompson (Manfred Mann) and Pino Palladino (Genesis/The Who). Add to that list hugely respected soul singers Jaki Graham and Ruby Turner and saxophonist Mel Collins (Bad Company/10CC/Dire Straits), honestly I could go on, but you get the idea by now...
Then add into the equation that all the artists who have contributed to this album (over 60 in all!) gave their time for free, as did the studios, the design team and in fact everybody involved in the project, so that all the proceeds from the sale of the CD could go directly to three fantastic and deserving charities (Macmillan Cancer Support/Haven House/Compton Hospice). Then you'll begin to get an idea of exactly what Robin George, who has recorded with everyone from Robert Plant and Phil Lynott to Glenn Hughes and John Wetton has achieved with 'LovePower and Peace'.
The resulting album is a glorious journey through genres and styles, resulting in seventeen songs that have been painstakingly crafted into perfect examples of everything from soul and blues, to AOR and all out rock, without ever feeling like they shouldn't belong together. In fact when the musicians involved are of the calibre collected together here, the songs begin to transcend genre stereotypes, instead just becoming phenomenal music.
www.rockheaven.net
Lovepower and Peace Charity CD Cover

Things move fast in the Music biz and when guitar legend Robin George was touched personally by the hospice movement and also saw your old scribe's piece about Music therapy and the arts therapies , he went into action. Opening his address book, which looks more like a Who's Who of contemporary music, Robin pulled together the critical mass of talent that now makes up the LovePower project. A clever combination of studio time fitted around everyone's busy tour schedules, with skillful drop-ins from those on the other side of the world, result in a set of masters (you can't call them 'master tapes' in the digital age) of musical excellence and diversity that would add up to a masterful talent showcase even if there wasn't a higher purpose.

This is not the usual feel good, conscience salving, Let's all get together and save the world [while rejuvenating our flagging careers] type outing, as the egos have been left at the door. The diversity of talent is reflected in diversity of styles from riff driven rock infused Alice to sweet soul of Ruby Turner and Jaki Graham. On the Love Power CD the musicianship is impeccable, the performances stellar and the songwriting has teeth. Unlike the gummy efforts of has beens who collect expenses cheques from excursions like this, these folks don't need their careers reviving, they don't need autotune and they gave their time for nothing. The studios around the world gave their time for nothing, the record company are making nothing and the musicians are making great music.

There are bitterseet ballads like Angelsong and Another Lonely Night another ballad, simultaneously both melancholy and whimsical...
"Do all the tracks start with the letter 'A' to keep 'em at the top of the ipod lists?" suggest plebs, stage left.

No. Bluesong begins with a 'B', obviously, although the first chord isn't B, the title just starts with the letter. Sung by Charlie George, not the legendary long haired Arsenal and Derby County player from the 70's (spot your old scribe's cultural references), but the singer/TV presenter who acquits herself well, despite the low expectations we all have of 'personality' crossovers from TV to tunes! Furthermore, Steve Hunter, the triple pick-up white SG wielding axeman from the Alice Cooper band and mid 70s lou Reed, lays down the guitar part with aplomb. This tune is stripped to the bone, minimal drum fills and simple expressive guitar figures.

'C' is for 'Cocoon', one of Robin George's tunes from his 'Life' catalogue. 'Pride', track 4, by Ruby Turner could stand up as a motown great (reminiscent of Stevie Wonder's productions). 'Kings Call' invites comparisons with the Travelling Wilburys; written by Phil Lynott and Robin George, it was an evolution beyond Thin Lizzy and deserved more attention than it got at the time, so this release might do the trick.

Help From My Friends?

Regular readers might expect the old scribe to supremely cynical about yet another rendition of this Lennon/McCartney classic, which is so often cheesily covered. This straight cover avoids dairy product comparisons, sentiments are never cheesy (a bad thing) and guitar solos never yogurty (good or bad depending on context). A singalong classic that gets respectful treatment from

  1. Ruby Turner, Jaki Graham & The LovePower Band: Love Power &Peace
  2. Seven Golden daffodils: Seven Golden daffodils
  3. Sean Harris & Howard Scarr: Cocoon
  4. Ruby Turner & The lovePower band: Pride
  5. Charlie george & The lovePower band: Bluessong
  6. The lovePower band & Friends: World
  7. The lovePower band: Kings Call
  8. David Byron & The lovePower band with Roger Flavalle: Tired Eyes
  9. The lovePower band & Friends: Another Lonely night
  10. The lovePower band & Friends: With A littel Help From My Friends
  11. Pete Goalby & Robin George: Mona Lisa Smile
  12. John Wetton & Robin George: Wasted Time
  13. Damage Control with 'Fast' Eddie Clarke: Alice
  14. Marshall law with robin George: No Justice
  15. Life with Nick Tart: (sounds like a TV show title) Heartline
  16. Robin George & Friends: Next To You
  17. Robin George & Friends: Angelsong

Conclusions

If this had arrived as a compilation showcasing the talents on a record company roster, from Soul greats like Ruby Turner & Jaki Graham, and Jaqui Williams, to a roll call of legendary rockers (including apearances from band members of Asia, Uriah Heap, UFO, Bad Co., AC/DC, King Crimson, Qireboys, Hanoi Rocks, UK Subs, Diamond Head, Trapeze, Magnum, Life, Notorious, Climax Blues Band, Tina Turner, Giorgio Moroder, Manfren Mann, The Who, the God of Hellfire Arthur Brown, Steve Hunter, Robert Plant and Jools Holland) and sax breaks from the man whose solos have graced the Rolling Stones, and your old scribe would have been well disposed to the content. Your old scribe loves a good compilation and this is certainly that, and well recorded despite having to be constructed from components in some places, because of the impossibility of getting this line up in one place at one time.

Add some excellent songwriting and the likelihood of a recommendation increases.

Forget every prejudice you have about benefits gigs and albums. Actually musically most of those are better completely forgotten. Cast them from your mind. This album leaves you wanting more from each foregrounded artist.

One by-product of this album, quite apart from the 3 excellent causes it supports (all close to your old scribes heart) is that you might hear something unexpected that turns you on to an unfamiliar artist. The many musicians, studios and producers involved will make nothing from this album while Three deserving charities will make everything from this CD.

If I didn't like this CD I would not have written a review, to protect the worthy causes, but the CD is worthy of recommendation on sound quality grounds and musical content. So there is no excuse, buy it immediately as it is released on October 3rd 2011.

© Copyright 2011 The Old Scribe - www.tnt-audio.com Mark Wheeler

Lovepower and Peace Charity CD Cover

LovePower And Peace’ is an eclectic but somehow cohesive collection of songs put together by Robin George and Angel Air Records in aid of charity. Uniquely, all the proceeds from its sales will go to the 3 charities of choice here.

George is joined by the great and the good from the UK’s rock, metal and soul scenes, underground movements all, but simply bursting at the seams with talent.At random:- Daniel Boone, Ken Hensley, Pete Goalby, Pino Palladino, Pete Way, John Wetton and Brian Tatler.

As you might expect, there are several choice cuts from George’s back catalogue, plus reworks of pop/rock standards. All in all, 17 cracking tracks.The real highlights are the sinuous, soulful title track, sung by Jacki Graham and Ruby Turner and ‘Pride’, a George/Turner co-write with a smouldering, seductive groove, liberally sprinkled with Motown magic, again sung by Turner.

 There’s plenty of room too for George’s tech rock, though it’s unusual hearing Sean Harris singing his very own version of ‘Cocoon’ and Charlie George singing ‘Bluesong’. ‘Wasted Time’ is an old Asia demo from the eighties, dug out and dusted down by Wetton and George. They turn it into a deeply satisfying – if slightly dated - Tech Rock / ELO pop hymn.

Elsewhere, Daniel Boone’s achingly eloquent vocals wring out every ounce of pathos from ‘Another Lonely Night’, a song originally written by Boone and George for Alvin Stardust. But we won’t hold that against them. George’s breakthrough song, ‘Heartline’ pops up again, densely constructed in the studio with Nick Tart contributing a suitably hard rock vocal performance.

Ribboned with melancholy, Phil Lynott’s tribute to Elvis, ‘Kings Call’ gets another outing, an ode from a giant of rock who went too soon to a giant of rock who went too soon.

Charity albums are often an indulgence, where unwritten excuses are made for second rate performances, but this stuff is dynamite. An outstandingly good rock album in its own right. And for the casual fan, a highly entertaining voyage of discovery.

The 3 charities are : Compton Hospice in Wolverhampton; Haven House in Essex and the Birmingham Centre For Arts Therapies. All 3 have websites. Take a look

http://www.compton-hospice.org.uk/ http://www.havenhouse.org.uk/ http://www.bcat.info/

Review by Brian McGowan http://www.midlandsrocks.co.uk/

Lovepower and Peace Charity CD Cover Just about every charitable issue gets a music project, or a single these days. But here ROBIN GEORGE has gathered no less than 50 artists of various genres for a good cause. Members and ex.members of bands like URIAH HEEP, UFO, DIAMOND HEAD, QUIREBOYS, and ASIA, to mention but a few, have all contributed. The main material comes from Robin´s back catalogue, but there are also added specials, and specially written songs. As further evidence of dedication all profits will go to BCAT, Haven House and the Compton Hospice.

Those who expect only hard rock or thereabouts will have to reconsider, the main object here is musicianship, and not distorted guitars. The title track maybe gentle rock with a message, but it is also proof of Robin´s dedication and the generosity of the artists involved. The voices of Ruby Turner and Jaki Graham add dimensions and the refrain could go on forever. It is fascinating to hear Robin´s old chestnuts in new or at least slightly different versions. Anyone not penchant to “Cocoon” or “Heartline” ought to see a doctor. Choirs of famous musicians and over 200 schoolchildren add credibility to the cause, and seldom has “With a Lilttle Help from My Friends” sounded so true. Or on his own with the LovePower Band, as they excell in a very emotional "King´s Call". I personally fancy the “return” of David Byron (R.I.P) in the soft and very suitable “Tired Eyes”, as well as hearing one of his successors to the Heep, Pete Goalby, make the most of “Mona Lisa Smile”. The aspiring rocker will probably like “Alice” and the MARSHAL LAW track “No Justice”. Most people will enjoy the album. It is a good thing that enjoyment is also giving a helping hand here. The album is a solid four, the cause is a solid 5/5.

www.festivalphoto.net Mikael Johannson
Lovepower and Peace Charity CD Cover

Those with elephantine memories will remember Robin George from his 1985 debut album ‘Dangerous Music’, possibly the greatest soft-rock album ever written; or maybe from the ‘History’ EP which preceded it, or from Ted Nugent’s cover of ‘Go Down Fighting’; or maybe from his production credit on Diamond Head’s second single. Whichever, the guy’s a genius with a lengthy track record although has never really focussed enough on any one direction to gatecrash the big time.

George’s latest offering ‘LovePower And Peace’ is a charity album with a split personality. The first ten tracks are a mix of originals and covers and feature the LovePower band – Robin George (guitars and vocals), Jacqui Williams (vocals) Pete Haycock (guitars), Mel Collins (sax), Charley Charlesworth (bass) and Charlie Morgan (drums) – aided and abetted by a host of luminaries including Ruby Turner, Ken Hensley, Sean Harris, David Byron and Morgan Fisher. Amongst the scattergun of rock, blues and soul, the pièce de résistance is undoubtedly the eight-and-a-half minutes of ‘With A Little Help From My Friends’ which allows the guest guitarists (including Brian Tatler, Dom Brown, Eddie Clark and Conny Bloom) to flex their muscles. The LovePower Band’s take on Phillip Lynott’s ‘Kings Call’ is a worthy effort too, and it’s great to hear David Byron on such good form on ‘Tired Eyes’.

After that come another seven cuts featuring just Robin George and assorted guests: Marshall Law romp through their own ‘No Justice’; the Pete Way/Robin George composition ‘Alice’ sounds like a track from ‘Dangerous Games’ as remixed by Kurt Cobain and features Eddie Clarke once more; and yet another version of George’s greatest solo hit ‘Heartline’ pops up, although the reworking and vocals courtesy of Diamond Head’s Nick Tart don’t really do it any favours this time around.

All profits go to Compton Hospice, Wolverhampton, Haven House, Essex, and the Birmingham Centre for Arts Therapies, and the album has such broad appeal there’s bound to be something on there you’ll like. So go buy a copy now.


http://johntuckeronline.com/
Lovepower and Peace Charity CD Cover

Whilst Robin George may not have become the household name he surely deserves to be, a quick glance at the amount of names willing to offer their contribution to this album goes a long way to showing just how much respect he has in the music world. His latest album for Angel Air Records LOVEPOWER AND PEACE was recorded and released with the intention to give one hundred per cent of the profits to three charities which is a fantastic effort really considering just how much work has gone into creating it.

The actual songs themselves are a mixture of older Robin George tracks, some stuff he recorded in various projects along the way, some more recently written material and a handful of covers too, but each has been meticulously re-created with a ridiculously long list of guest contributions. Let’s reel a few of them off then shall we? …. We’ve got David Byron (URIAH HEEP), Chris Slade (AC/DC, DIO), Darrell Bath (UK SUBS), Conny Bloom (HANOI ROCKS), Dom Brown (DURAN DURAN), Eddie Clarke (MOTORHEAD), Mel Collins (KING CRIMSON), Ken Hensley (URIAH HEEP), Steve Hunter (ALICE COOPER BAND), Pete Way (UFO), John Wetton (ASIA) and many, many more, There’s also a couple of really good female soul singers involved in Jaki Graham and Ruby Turner, a full male choir and a full 200member children’s choir too. Basically hundreds of people were involved in the making of this album, which could have been a disaster really but the songs speak for themselves. Everyone involved with this project gave their time for free, including the art team, studio producers, photographers and record label too, now that’s quite impressive too really in an era where the adage “time is money’ has never been so relevant.

With a long tracklist of seventeen songs there’s definitely a couple of tracks here and there that aren’t as good as the rest, but close to the cream of the crop would probably be the one-two punch of opening tracks LOVEPOWER AND PEACE and then directly after it SEVEN GOLDEN DAFFODILS. BLUESONG, MONA LISA SMILE, George’s best known song HEARTLINE and the mellow ANGELSONG are also more than worth looking out for too. My personal favourite moment of the album however is a truly awesome star studded cover of WITH A LITTLE HELP FROM MY FRIENDS which manages to combine the original BEATLES version with the more moving JOE COCKER version. It doesn’t sound completely like either version and really is a great individual rendition.

As far as value for money goes, hey you get seventeen songs that feature a ridiculously large amount of talented people, but you can also feel good in knowledge that every cent you pay for this album will go to helping people in need. I can’t think of a more worthy album in a long time as LOVEPOWER AND PEACE, everybody that has an interest in any of the people involved in this project should go and buy a copy immediately.

Written By ZeeZee  myglobalmind.com

Rating : 10/10

Lovepower and Peace Charity CD Cover

This has been a labour of love over the past couple of years for Robin George as he has assembled a set of top draw musicians and vocalists to appear on this charity album. Before you even mention the guest musicians, the LovePower Band itself features such names as Pete Haycock (Climax Blues Band/ELO Part 2), M People’s Jacqui Williams and respected saxophonist Mel Collins, who has worked with Bad Company, Camel and the Rolling Stones amongst many others.

The songs on here come from all of Robin George’s solo and band output to date including Life, Notorious, Damage Control and Marshall Law are present with ‘No Justice’, as Robin George produced one of their albums. Even those that are sadly no longer with us like David Byron, have their original vocal backed by a modern band recording.

Highlights? Being totally honest the whole damn album! But to cherry pick a few great top hear Pete Goalby (ex-Uriah Heep) again on ‘Mona Lisa Smile’. There is a mini-Fastway reunion on ‘Alice’ with ‘Fast’ Eddie Clarke hooking-up again with UFO’s Pete Way – Spike of the Quireboys shares the lead vocal on this one with Robin. There is a superb run through ‘With A Little Help From My Friends’ where Robin is joined by Sean Harris (ex-Diamond Head) and Jacqui Williams (boy can she hit the high notes!). Former Mott The Hoople man Morgan Fisher and Conny Bloom (The Electric Boys) are amongst the backing musicians. ‘Seven Golden Daffodils’ is worth a listen for the sublime harmony vocal parts. Finally, ‘Heartline’, Robin’s biggest solo hit, gets a reworking with current Diamond Head vocalist Nick Tart singing on this one. At first it sounds very strange but it soon grows on the listener and gives the original a good run for its money.

A winner in two ways – a good resume of Robin George’s work to date and all the profits go to three worthy charities.

*****
Classic Rock/Jason Ritchie Review

 

Lovepower and Peace Charity CD Cover

A master guitarist reaching out for his address book and for the listeners’ hearts – in the memory of "the good and the gifted we lost too soon" and for the tragedy not to strike again.

You can’t blame Robin George for his desire to play safe after two of his promising endeavors have been thwarted by ailing singers, David Byron and Phil Lynott who chose substances-fuelled deaths over life. Both are present here, on the guitarist’s star-studded project from which all profits fuel three British charities -- all in the name of life.

There’s Lynott’s spirit in the LOVEPOWER BAND’s take on his Elvis’ tribute "King’s Call", in George’s hands a moving, acoustically framed lament for THIN LIZZY’s singer himself, while Byron’s own voice carries another twilit ballad, "Tired Eyes". That highlights the leader’s MO: a careful use of existing tracks for additions and overdubs. Yet it never sounds like a recycling, as DIAMOND HEAD’s Sean Harris breathes fire in LIFE’s "Cocoon" and Jacqui Williams’ voice completely transforms old chestnut "Seven Golden Daffodils", rough in DAMAGE CONTROL’s version and totally transcendental now. One of the latter group’s recordings, "Alice", forms a part of the bonus section of the CD, "Friends of LovePower" alongside gems from Robin’s archives featuring, among others, more URIAH HEEP’s members, Pete Goalby and John Wetton, but the bulk of it rides on the back of new songs.

It starts with a title cut which grows from an acoustic roll into a gospel hot-air balloon soaring on Ruby Turner and Jaki Graham’s soulful belting and floating with Mel Collins’ sax, Ken Hensley’s Hammond and a mighty choir. The same package lies in the foundation of the grooving, slide-smoothed "World" where Arthur Brown joins the "Emmerdale" actress Freya Copeland Vix and Robin George at the idiosyncratic mic. And, of course, there’s his shining guitar in the center of it all, but the veteran’s only happy to share the spotlight even in these stakes, so "Bluesong" cradles Steve Hunter’s solo. What with the seriousness of it all, "Pride" is a jolting slab of funk to shake up one’s mood, and "Another Lonely Light" harks innocently back to the early ’60s. Perhaps, "With A Little Help From My Friends" seems a bit hammy as a closer to the main part of the for more veterans – from MOTORHEAD, MOTT THE HOOPLE and more - and, in the end, it is what it does when an artist calls for the indifferent kindred spirits to get there for the right reasons. Listening is taking part in this one success of an endeavor.***
Dmitry Epstein http://dmme.net

Lovepower and Peace Charity CD Cover
Unlike some charity 45s, LovePower and Peace actually boasts a worthy song for a worthy cause. A sweet melody, heartfelt vocal and a rousing refrain that leaves no excuses not to dig deep and help Macmillan Cancer Support by BUYING NOW 
Tim Jones Record Collector
Superb musicianship, magnificent vocals from Ruby Turner and Jaki Graham and an excellent cause. Love Power & Peace deserves to be a monster smash.Gary Bushell.

For Online reviews of LPP single click: 

Sea Of Tranquility Review Dmme Review Express and Star Review





Notorious – Radio Silence (Angel Air)
Robin George is one of those nearly men, both in the sense that he has collaborated with some of the biggest names in rock and metal (Phil Lynott, Glenn Hughes, John Wetton, Robert Plant, David Byron) and also in the sense that a lot of the projects he’s been involved with nearly got an album released! In recent years Angel Air Records have made it one of their goals to collaborate with George to allow much of this hidden and unreleased material to see the light of day.

The latest in this line comes in the shape of ‘Radio Silence’ by Notorious, which was the name for George’s collaboration with the at the time just departed lead singer from NWOBHM legends Diamond Head, Sean Harris. George had produced the song ‘Sweet & Innocent’ on the Head’s classic ‘Lightning To The Nations’ album, so when Harris departed the band it didn’t take long for the pair to pool their talents and record the quick fire set of songs that make up ‘Radio Silence’.  Instead of, as they were advised, releasing the album straight away in its rough and ready state, two years were wasted going from studio to studio and through countless producers trying to make the songs absolutely perfect. Perfection though never appeared and the chance was gone, with these fifteen songs ending up gathering dust for twenty five years.

So with George’s blessing ‘Radio Silence’ is silent no more and what a surprising mix it is. I suppose with the electro-AOR sound of much of Robin George’s solo material, I shouldn’t be surprised that there are many of those same influences on show here, but I had expected Harris to bring a more metal based edge to proceedings. On the strength of the opening title track, that proved to be the case, with a gritty riff and some excellent layered vocals, it is a rip snorting beginning to the album. However it all goes off at a tangent from there, with everything from Richard Marx and INXS, to The Police and the drum sound of Fine Young Cannibals being evoked across a set of songs that never quite lives up to the harder hitting, more straight forward approach of the opener. George is superb, if a little too deep in the mix and Harris brings more commercial sheen to his delivery than his previous work had ever suggested, with the mix of rock, AOR, funk and eighties synth, being an obvious attempt to gain some chart success. In truth, I’m not sure that these songs are really quite sharp, or smart enough to have broken Notorious big, but they are enjoyable enough, even if very of their time.

Whilst not essential ‘Radio Silence’ is a further interesting chapter in the colourful story of Robin George’s vast and eclectic musical journey and for that alone, it is well worth a listen.

Steven Reid Fireworks

 Steven Reid

Robin George (the archetypal nearly man) recorded this album together back in 1985.
George's outstanding solo album, 'Dangerous Music' had gone under with its bankrupt record label. Harris had just broken with Diamond Head.
Young, ambitious, tenacious, with
'Radio Silence' they aimed to "revolutionise the world of rock".
 
The cruel historical fact is that it didn't. But the truth is that it could have.
They laid down 15 tracks full of raw emotion, searing imagery and two performances from the heart. This original recording was just brimming over with great songs and benchmark performances.
The Record Company execs wanted a more polished, pristine sound. As is often the way, the many recording sessions in countless studios emasculated the duo's original sound, resulting in a stillborn version of the album.
25 years on, Angel Air have given George and Harris the opportunity to let the world experience their original vision, with the release of that first recording.
 
And what an album this is. Harris is an absolutely outstanding vocalist. His voice has such an emotional range. It can soothe, it can rip up the scenery.  It can do rugged, it can do seduction. It can do rock, pop, funk.
George's sturdy, sinuous melodies, frequently set to thunderous riffs and wailing axes are perfect for Harris's dynamic, dominant vocals. The title track,
'Radio Silence' inherits George's Tech AOR sound, while the magnificent 'The S'Walk' might easily have been the prototype for INXS's funk/groove/rock recordings that filled dance floors and dominated Top Forties in the eighties and nineties.
By the time you get to third track, '
Arianne', a commercial poprock monster of a song - eerily echoing Lloyd Cole - you wonder why the execs ever thought any of this needed fixing.

The sweet, wordy
'Better The Devil You Know' has an air of innocent wonder, full of jangling guitars and oohing, aahing bgvs, borrowed from the fresh, immediate pop of the sixties, and there won't be many whose pulse isn't quickened by 'It's Energy's booming, arena friendly hook.
The sudden swing to the thumping Westcoast rock'n'soul of
'Do Like A Man' might be a little hard to take, but at a minimum it demonstrates this duo's versatility.
And that notion clearly pulses loud and proud at the heart of this album. Two young musicians with enormous talent who can turn their hand to anything.
It released to enormous critical acclaim.
But guess what?
Within the year of release, the label folded and the album was deleted.
Thank God for visionaries like Angel Air, exposing us to the fleeting genius of Notorious.

Written by Brian Revelationz Mazgazine

The silence may come after defeaning thunder - and two heavy stalkers provide it here in exquisite spades.

Another album marked by a Robin George curse, which means it sunk on the original release to be ripe for rediscovery and revaluation two decades on. This time the guitarist's partner in crime was Sean Harris from DIAMOND HEAD whom George produced, but what the pair delivered had a pronounced commercial edge. Perhaps, not too commercial for the late '80s to make it big time, though the bubbly shuffle of "The S'Walk" was a neat chart-biter with its P-Funk gloss instead of metal one could expect from its masterminds, while "You Need More" is an upbeat, if airy. ballad up there with the best from the hairy royalty of its decade.

Here, re-sequenced and expanded, the songs punch the bag from the title cut, that has a bluesy slide lick squeezed between the funky jive and harmony choruses, to the swaggering closer "Good Times" that sums up the hour spent with this album. Even when the flow is loose, like in the bass-shaking and harmonica-riding "Do Like A Man", it goes straight to the nerve as does the silky, strings-wrapped blues "I Believe In You" which showcases Harris' soft spot rather than hard place - but "The Game's Up" recycles the "All Right Now" riff for the umpteenth time, while "It's Energy" feels too generic to ripple a soul. The Philly-sounding brass and guitars mix of "Soul On Fire" rectifies that, yet "Radio Silience" still remains a product of its time, a nice one with it.

Let it Rock DME music site

One of the interesting things about specialist reissue label Angel Air is that a number of their releases are by artists who could be classed as "nearly men"; ones who almost made that all important breakthrough but for reasons of record company politics, management incompetence, poor timing or simple bad luck it never worked out. That could certainly be said of Notorious, the band assembled by Robin George and former Diamond Head vocalist Sean Harris who cut these recordings back in 1985 only to see them gather dust for two years by which time their moment had passed.

As George notes in the detailed sleeve notes of the bands history this is "one that got away" for Radio Silence is a direct attempt to hit the mainstream and the majority of the tracks are simply tailor made for 80's rock radio. Quite unfamiliar territory for Harris then whose vocals are some way removed from his days with Diamond Head as here he goes for an altogether more clean cut approach ("Arianne", "You Need More") backed up by George's funk rock groves ("The S'Walk", "Soul on Fire"). The stuttering title track is another riff heavy anthem and back in the days when singles were all important there are around five songs here that could effortlessly have graced the Top 40 on both sides of the Atlantic.

A really impressive package then and a tantalising glimpse of what might have been had the duo had the good fortune to have released this album at the right time.
www.seaoftranquility.org
NOTORIOUS made headlines straight away. Robin George (DAVID BYRON, PHIL LYNOTT etc.) joined forces with Sean Harris (ex. DIAMOND HEAD). Two song writers met and of cause Robin handled production duties. Rock is the right word, and the single “The S´Walk” even echoes of DURAN DURAN. One thing that there is plentiful of here is musical ability. Robin modernized his sound a bit here, and Sean steered clear of heavy metal, as well as his previous band´s increasingly progressive sound. The sophisticated “Arianne” is augmented by Sean´s sensitive vocal style. This is the original mix of the album, the one that even their manager opted for, but. Alas, not the one the suits of the record company released. They get down to a cosy ballad with some pepper added in “You Need More”, which is one of my favourite moments. Old rockers tend to favour funk, and NOTORIOUS do a DEEP PURPLE in “Do Like a Man” and “Touch”. The strength of the album is soft rock songs with strong refrains, and it is all very typical of its day and age. I am impressed by the genuine craftsmanship of tracks like “It´s Energy” and “The Game´s Up”. If I hadn´t heard this way back I would never have guessed it was Sean Harris on vocals, not with the sweet soft velvety voice, as in “Believe in You”. There are too funky and soft moments here too, e.g. “Eyes of the World”. That track was awarded the fast forward button, but that is it on this album. If “The S´Walk” was aimed at the charts I bet “Soul on Fire”, complete with brass and all, was even more so. In the early nineties I was strictly against this, but now almost 20 years later this is (mainly) highly enjoyable melodic rock. If there hadn´t been so many if´s I believe the “Good Times” would have rolled and NOTORIOUS would have reached heights far beyond what they actually achieved.
http://www.festivalphoto.net/index.php?page=reviews&review=710
  Notorious was a project put together by guitarist Robin George (Phil Lynott, David Byron, Magnum) and vocalist Sean Harris (Diamond Head) back in the late 80's and became caught up in record company politics eventually seeing the band getting dropped and the album deleted a matter of weeks after its original release. The duo went into the studio to knock out a melodic rock record but the album was mixed, remixed and, with the changing of the sounds, the music lost the duos original intent. Now for the first time, thanks to the guys over at Angel Air Records we are presented with the digitally remastered and expanded edition of the albums original demo recordings, that finally allow us to hear exactly what Robin and Sean had in mind.

Most of the songs have stood up well to the test of time, showcasing the songwritting quality that Notorious bought together.
There is a great mix of melodic rock styles presented here, from the riff driven Radio Silence, to the funky groove of songs like The S'walk, to the bluesy commercial tracks like Arianne and You Need More. Robins  guitar work is amazingly versatile, providing Sean Harris with the perfect platform to let his voice really shine. Sean himself sings with a crisper cleaner style than his previous work with Diamond Head.
A Great album that could have been a massive comercial success had it not been for the politics at Geffen records back in the day. Well worth checking out, Very highly reconmended.

http://sinisterangelsrealm.blogspot.com/
David Byron, Magnum, Phil Lynott, Robert Plant, Diamond Head, Sean Harris, Life and Roy Wood are just some of the artists that Robin George has worked with over the years.
Angel Air have pulled together this timely 2 disc set from George's archives that features studio album Crying Diamonds and live release Dangerous Music from 1985 (where he is joined by a band that includes original Magnum drummer, the late Kex Gorin).
Crying Diamonds showcases some of Robins greatest songs including “Learn The Dance”, which he co-wrote with Byron, a fiery “Judy”, and the reflective yet deceptively powerful pair “Yesterday’s News” and “Thanks For The Memories” along with "Crying Diamonds" a track that he Co-wrote with Phil Lynott himself!The second CD.

Dangerous Music Live ‘85, sees Robin on the road, playing some of his best tracks from across his carear to that point. Not the greatest of live recording, more akin to a good quality audience recorded bootleg than a pro recorded live album but it does capture the sets atmosphere well.This double cd set is a great introduction to one of the most versatile and talented writer / performers / producers that the Uk has ever produced.

http://sinisterangelsrealm.blogspot.com/

Robin George - Dangerous Music (CD, Angel Air, Rock/pop)
Although he has only achieved cult status in the United States at this point in time, Great Britain's Robin George is legendary in his home country.
Although he's probably best known as a backing guitarist for a variety of well-known British superstars, George is very much a songwriter and musician in his own right. And now...25 years after it's original release...his debut album is once again being made available to the public.
Dangerous Music is a very slick commercial album.
But George was one of those artists who was able to balance commercial appeal with artistic integrity...and thus his music was very appealing to both communities.
The album features plenty of Robin's tasty guitar work (of course)...but it also presents many songs that, in a perfect world, would have been major hits.
This disc features the eleven tracks that appeared on the original vinyl release plus five cool bonus tracks.
This is an excellent album that unfortunately got lost in the blur of the 1980s most likely because the original record company (Bronze) folded soon after the initial release.
This reissue will hopefully make more people aware of this talented fellow's early recorded work. Killer cuts include "Spy," "No News Is Good News," and "Don't Turn Away." Top pick.
  Baby Sue

Life - Cocoon (CD, Angel Air, Pop)
Reissue of Life's 1997 album (actually recorded in 1995 but released in 1997) remastered...with bonus tracks. This band was the project spearheaded by guitarist/vocalist/producer Robin George working with vocalist Nick Tart (from Diamond Head). Cocoon has a big, thick, arena rock sound that incorporates elements from 1970s progressive rock with 1990s heavy metal. Plenty of big keyboard sounds and fast noodly lead guitars here. Fifteen tracks including "Dangerous Music," "What Goes Around Comes Around," and "The End of the Line."

Damage Control are a power trio formed by Robin George…what you get on Raw is good old fashioned blues rock. One of the joys of the album is, as the name implies, the raw sound of George’s guitar; its rough edge dominating this classic sounding album.

Classic Rock Society Magazine 

Formed by Robin George, with Pete Way and Chris Slade, this powerhouse trio rocks the blues.
Mojo

 Only a moron would dismiss an album that pools the pedigree of Robin George (ex-Thin Lizzy), Chris Slade (ex-AC/DC) and Pete Way (ex-Ozzy). The three warhorses of Damage Control stare defiantly from Raw’s back cover with snarls and sunglasses. Needless to say these guys can all play- George’s beefy, British sounding guitar, in particular would thrill even if he was playing Three Blind Mice…

A British Rock Supergroup, Damage Control produces an album of bluesy hard rock..although at times the sound takes on a surprisingly grungy edge.

The three musicians involved are all undoubtedly skilled veterans of the rock scene and Robin has plenty of nice licks up his sleeve.

Heavy Magazine

The name LIFE Robin George, then a young guitar slinger, first used for his debut single in 1980 and revived this four-letter word in the early '90s when, having gained a great experience as a sidekick for THIN LIZZY's Phil Lynott and URIAH HEEP's David Byron and a producer, he came up with a band of his own in the company of Nick Tart on vocals. The group toured intensively recording this album along the way, but in the times of grunge reign this kind of melodic hard rock, fashionable half a decade earlier, didn't find a listener, yet now, in expanded form, it proudly stands its ground.

It's a strong work, the George-Tart co-write "The Language Of Love" boasting a catchy blues jive and a lot of funk, whereas the titular song is gospel-tinged and "Oxygen" flows as a soulful ballad. Some songs on the record had obviously been in place before the band came to be: the opener, "Dangerous Music", riff-rich and adorned with John Young's keyboards, originally was the title track for Robin's 1985's album, yet here it has much more grit - which must have made a live favorite - and provides the base for the more loose "Don't Come Crying". Still, while the leader's guitar playing is excellent throughout, tracks like "Losing You" are strictly of their era and today sound dated; at the same time, "Let It Burn" and "Rush" rage very contemporarily.

Sadly, LIFE's life wasn't long - "The End Of The Line" bids farewell on an exquisite acoustic passage - but with George still active and Tart fronting DIAMOND HEAD, "Cocoon" has both historic value and emotional zip to be viable in this day and age.

***
http://dmme.net/reviews

With an album entitled Cocoon we might have expected the Life project to make their first release on the Chrysalis label.
"Oh no!" groan plebs, stage left, "the old scribe's CD reviews are prompting punnilingus"

Robin George, the guitarist and driving force behind this project, has produced or remixed many of the Angel Air releases and notably played on the Damage Control supergroup project. A lifestyle more workaholic than rock and roll seems to have overcome middle aged rockers as their greater experience and increased skill makes possible those ideas they may have carried half-formed for years. naturally the psychological aesthetics of the middle aged writers and performers are more likely to strike a chord with middle aged listeners like your old scribe. This is good news for such performers as we're a disc buying public not a file sharing public and we tend to demand the higher quality that journeyman honed skill creates. Another winner is Angel Air Music who are a small independent record company not a multinational entertainment conglomerate who would be more interested in the reality show quick buck.

In addition to being a skilled producer Robin is a versatile first call guitarist who seems to be able to produce any style and any tone at will. This is what has kept him earning and perhaps what has kept him safely away from becoming public property; guitarists with a one-trick sound often become more famous with the record buying public who recognise the style as a brand and dislike anything new or different. A public whose loyalty to those types of players is not unconditional; such superstar fan loyalty is 100% dependant on the artist sticking to familiar product, even to the extent of shouting 'Judas' in one famous Manchester Free Trade Hall incident incident suggesting religious mania seizing those who demand the same old stuff from performers. Robin George doesn't offer that at all; in 1988 I had the same reaction to Jeff Healey the first time I saw him perform (at Nottingham's Rock City) that he was too versatile to become a guitar hero and was more a music lover's musician than the potential object of a musical personality cult. The chameleons of sound, who can match their playing to any material sound fresh every tune but can't be predictable enough to inspire mindless worship. This rambling preamble is to prepare you not to expect the same as Damage Control or Robin's work with David Byron (hence nor of Uriah Heap), so what should audiophiles expect of this new CD?

Robin plays safe with the opener by using Dangerous Music, title track of his '85 album and possibly the least challenging track on this album, described as "a typical cheesy intro" by my 15 year old son. The second track guitar sounds like so like Free we have to ask what kind of deal Robin struck at the crossroads... and if Robin George has much of the deceased Koss about him, singer Nick tart is scarily comparable to the probably still alive Robert Plant, emphasised by Robin's production which does at time resort to emphasising this resemblance.

"This is a REAL STEREO website" challenge plebs, stage left, "Track by track obsessions are surely the province of Music Nerds and their ilk."

There are tracks equalling the best of Red hot Chilli Peppers (comment by 17 year old son) or Alice Cooper (ditto), but it's not that he's too generic; the opposite is true, Robin George is almost not generic enough (the 17 year old's view again). This is an album without fillers. While Cocoon lacks a consistent identity (perhaps your old scribe was brought up on too many concept albums) it also lacks fillers. Despite the handy remote control there's no temptation to skip.

This CD holds the listener's attention with consistent musicianship and sound quality until the closing track; perhaps too much compression on individual instruments for audiophile tastes, overall compression is much less than typical these days. The final The End of the Line track is well cranked up, relying on production skill for dynamic shading, and succeeding.

Life's Cocoon is immaculate and I'm beginning to suspect Robin George has OCD in the control room, an occasional mistake might roughen the texture like Viktor Schlovsky's Ostranene.

TNT MAGAZINE

The moniker LIFE was first used in 1980, when guitarist, vocalist and song writer ROBIN GEORGE released a single on a small label. Back then the band consisted of the likes of Robin (of cause), Mark Stanway (Later of MAGNUM fame) and Dave Holland (ex TRAPEEZE, later JUDAS PRIEST). Robin himself had served time in bands with Roy Wood and David Byron, before going solo with “Dangerous Music”. He was also part of a very late incarnation of THIN LIZZY. Robin has played with and produced with a number of famed musicians without really getting into the spotlight himself. In 1992 Robin formed a band with Nick Tart, later of DIAMOND HEAD, bassist Chris Cliff and keyboard player John Young. Today Robin is involved in bands/projects like DAMAGE LIMITATION and THE LOVEPOWER. But back to 1992, and the first real official release of LIFE, I hope there is still life in the project.

First out is “Dangerous Music”, and it works nicely in true British fashion from the first chord on. They place themselves in a genre of rock, 80´s and hard rock without becoming AOR. Apart from that “The American Way” is gentle, with a penchant for JOE LYNN TURNER. The bluesy and somewhat crawling style is back again in the title track. Too bad that very track feels less inspired than a lot of others on the album. “Freeride” echoes more of the 60´6/70´s than of the nineties, but is part o a kind of core of the album, a core of thirty years of Brit rock. The lighter ballad “Oxygen” would no doubt have brought in millions of $ for a hair metal band back in the late eighties. But now it has been overlooked in spite of velvety vocals from Nick, and a heartbroken guitar courtesy of Robin. I remember Robin as a younger talent with old-fashioned style, and “What Goes Around Comes Around” confirms my memories. It sounds way older than the date of this album. The album is filled to the brim with good times rock on one hand, and heart-felt relation problems on the other, as in “Losing You”. The blues in songs like “I Believed in You” was probably an obstacle to get a record contract in 1992, the album was too cheerful for its day, plus that GARY MOORE had sort of trademarked the blues at the time. Another issue is that the gems are too scarce. There are “Dangerous Music” (of cause), “Oxygen and few more but they are among the bonus tracks (“Let It Burn” and “The End of the Line”). The latter is a really stylish closer
When Robin was eight he became very attached to a plastic BEATLES guitar, at 14 he joined a band and at 16 he turned professional. Soon he started his own band LIFE, and during his career he has played with the likes of ROBERT PLANT, PHIL LYNOTT, DAVID BYRON, GLENN HUGHES, JOHN WETTON and Mark Stanway of MAGNUM. Not bad for a lad from Wolverhampton! “Dangerous Music” was originally released on Bronze Records in 1985, and “Heartline” was chosen to be a single. But things went sour when the company folded, and a planned second album went missing in the aftermath. This was only one of many set-backs that have befallen on this
talented musician. How good is “Dangerous Music” 25 years after?

Heartline” opens this remastered edition. There is something of hit pop about it, plucky keyboards and background vocals was a sure bet 25 years ago. There are plenty of interesting musicians contributing; Pino Palladino and PHLI LYNOTT share bass duties, Kex Gorham (ex. MAGNUM) and Dave Holland (ex. JUDAS PRIEST) share the drumming and Mark Stanway contributed keyboards. “Spy” is pop rock with a hit refrain that sticks like superglue. Robin´s guitar still rocks no matter the amount of pop refrains that has been applied. The thing I have problems with is when the vocals are too high-pitched, e.g. “Stolen From My Heart”. The best moments are Robin´s guitar in keyboard-laden songs like “Shout”. There was no shortage of winning refrains. Robin has always mixed his contemporaries with his personal older influences; “Hit List” does not sound like a track from the eighties. The compulsory ballad takes a while, but “Don´t Turn Away” encourages slow dancing with full body contact without being overly sentimental. It feels sincere all in all. The poppy “Space Kadett” closes the original album, a true excess in Brit 80´s. The bonus tracks are three songs live at The Tommy Vance Show; “Heartline”, “Spy” and “No News Is good News”, plus Robin´s own mixes of “Heartline” and “Don´t Turn Away”. Live they sound less 80´s neon-coloured plastic and more rock, as is often the case of melodic hard rock from that era. Robin´s delightful mix provides new lease to the ballad, while “Heartline” moves up the rock ladder. This makes it altogether five extra reasons to purchase this excellent album. I wouldn´t want to be without this splendid piece of British rock history!

The secret weapon of British guitar army shoots with both his barrels.

Mostly known as a sidekick to the stars, it's on his own that Robin George gets a real kick out of the music he plays; it's not vanity, though, it's the fact that the guitarist's own voice - not pretentious but pleasant vocals - doesn't distract from his instrument. Here's the whole package, then, on these two discs, with 10 years between them, the studio and concert one.

The earlier, "Dangerous Music Live", has a period charm but transcends it thanks to the angular riffing and fiery solos, so the commerical gems "Heartline" and "Showdown" come counterbalanced with spiky groovers such as "Spy", which Robin would re-cut two decades later with his new band, DAMAGE CONTROL, that picked up where DANGEROUS MUSIC left off with this set. It rocks hard, bonus tracks underlining the power of "No News Is Good News", where the rhythm section, RENAISSANCE's Jon Camp and MAGNUM's Ken Gorin, propel the main man's axe to rage wildly together in "History", with the title track and "Go Down Fighting" packing the best punch.

"Crying Diamonds" is much more mature work, infused with a sense of tragedy from losing two friends: URIAH HEEP's David Byron, the guitarist's partner in shaping up the muscular bluesy funk of "Learn The Dance", and Phil Lynott who George co-wrote the titular Beatlesque song with and whose "King's Call" he re-imagined acoustically to make it a valediction to the THIN LIZZY man. But the memorable chorus of "Face To Face" bubbles with vitality, while "Cocoon", the soulful would-be axis of Robin's next band's album, sees the master foray into the Brian May harmonic solo territory. Unlike many other guitarists who made their names in the '80s, Robin George, also known as a skilful producer, never overplays, and his work is tasty on each of the 14 tracks, plus four additional cuts including a couple recorded in his own time by Robert Plant; yet there's no classic rock slant to the record, what with the alternative edge of "Whatever Goes Around Comes Around" that presages the due recognition its author is getting now. A little classic.

DMME.NET - CLASSIC ROCK AND BEYOND

The David Byron Band

This is enjoyable rock; great vocals, great guitar and good keys feature…A little slice of history.
Classic Rock Society Magazine

David Byron Band - Lost and Found (Double CD, Angel Air, Rock/pop)
Most of us only know
David Byron as the lead vocalist in the 1970s progressive rock band Uriah Heep...and that is most certainly what he is universally remembered for. David's high range wailing was one of the trademarks of the Uriah Heep sound...along with the ultra-big keyboard sounds of Ken Hensley. After several years of major success with Heep, apparently Byron and Hensley started having interpersonal problems...and David ended up leaving the band. Sadly, in 1985 he ended up dying from what were apparently complications related with alcohol consumption. Lost and Found sheds light on Byron's post-Heep music. The double disc set features material recorded from 1980 to 1982 with Robin George. The tracks on this album are much more like direct shots of rock and blues than what was offered by Uriah Heep. This is an interesting snapshot showing what could've been if David had survived. In addition to studio tracks, the second CD also includes eight cuts recorded live in Liverpool in 1980.

Baby Sue Rock Reviews

Boasts great guitar lines from Robin George and might be today regarded as a minor classic if only it had been released at the time. An interesting release I certainly enjoyed listening to. 

Heavy Magazine
David Byron Band  – Lost And Found
 - Angel Air
The late David Byron deserved a better lot in life, but like too many others before him he died of a lifestyle;  succumbing  to his battle with alcoholism in 1985 only a month after his thirty eighth birthday. Byron of course made his mark as the charismatic front man for Uriah Heep who between 1969 and 1976 churned out ten albums which included such classics as Demons & Wizards and The Magician’s Birthday. However by 1976 his problems had escalated to the point where Heep were forced to sack him. Without the security of Heep, and more importantly without a strong songwriting partner like Ken Hensley or Mick Box, Byron’s various post-Heep projects and solo career never really got off the ground.

Lost And Found is double CD re-release from Angel Air Records that gathers together David’s demo recordings, rehearsals, and portions of a live show recorded in Liverpool in 1980. Disc one concentrates on original recordings from 1982 and features the young baby faced guitarist Robin George trying his best to rev up what unfortunately amounts to a bunch of tepid sounding rockers, although Byron does turn in a very poignant vocal on the final track “One Minute More”. The second disc only fairs slightly better, as it begins by taking the listener through a rather ragged sounding London rehearsal from 1981.The set concludes with the energetic Liverpool show, which sees the band, which in addition to George also featured sax man Mel Collins, concentrating primarily on new material from his then yet to be released On The Rocks album. Songs like “Bad Girl” and “Start Believing” definitely comes across better in the live setting, and in general the material here has more of an edge to it than the studio versions. Byron doesn’t abandon his past entirely either as they offer up a couple of Heep classics in “July Morning” and “Sweet Lorraine” to keep the punters happy. Is it enough to make this collection a worthwhile purchase? Well I’d say if you’re a casual fan then you can probably afford to take a pass on Lost And Found. If on the other hand you’re a diehard fan of both Heep and David Byron’s solo work, then you’ll probably want to add this one to your collection, even though it definitely feels like it’s aimed at the completist.

    -Ryan Sparks

Unearthed from the personal archives of guitarist Robin George, Lost and Found covers the era of the David Byron Band from the early 80's and is issued as an expansive two disc set via Angel Air. Disc One offers the bands demos from 1982 for an album that never ultimately saw the light of day; the charismatic Byron was clearly still singing well even at this point in his career and in Robin George he had found an ideal guitarist to give the material a more contemporary edge. George contributes some smooth blues based riffs and "Bad Girl" and "Fool For A Pretty Face" would both have made ideal singles. Disc Two is split between band rehearsals from 1981 and eight songs from a live show in Liverpool in 1980. The latter is of particular interest as an example of just how tight the band were at the time and inevitably the Uriah Heep classics "July Morning" and "Sweet Lorraine" are the highlights and made all the more memorable by some sprightly sax from Mel Collins.

Detailed sleeve notes and previously unseen photographs make this a very worthwhile package and one which hold significant appeal for fans of the golden age of Uriah Heep and provides an excellent reminder of what a star performer David Byron really was and how much he is missed.

ROBIN GEORGE – guitarist, producer, band leader and vocalist. In his various guises he has worked with the likes of ROBERT PLANT, DAVID BYRON, PHILIP LYNOTT/THIN LIZZY – and WITCHFINDER GENERAL! Rock and pop are mixed in his rather soft output. Celebrity and fame have eluded him in spite of many years in the business. I am rather schizophrenic about him myself. Robin has a fantastic guitar sound, a fine and easily digested voice – but also a penchant for pop.

“Crying Diamonds” opens with “Learn the Dance”, which was co-written with DAVID BYRON. The album breathes gentle classic rock, not least in the contagious “Face to Face”, a song that BON JOVI would have squeezed a lot of $ from. To me, a typical ROBIN GEORGE song is like “Flying”. It´s well arranged, has a good refrain, neat guitar work, a fine chorus, but it is also a bit thin of muscle and soft. The title track off LIFE`S “Cocoon” also gets an overhaul, with a result that reminds me of THE BEATLES. “Haunted” was co-written with Daniel Boone (alias PETER GREEN), and GLENN HUGHES has covered it. You can tell that Robin´s influences range from PETER GREEN, JOHNNY WINTER, ERIC CLAPTON etc. Most of the songs have a ring of earlier decades. Robin´s era with PHIL LYNOTT is hailed with the title track (which was co-written with Phil) and Phil´s ELVIS tribute “King´s Call”. They are not ordinary rocker´s but a title track inspired by THE BEATLES and an emotional ballad. These two types of songs suit Robin best, the rock part is best represented by the solo of the title track, and mostly there. Another typical Robin track is the bluesy “Yesterday´s News”. The mix of soft rock, blues and an excellent arrangement is easily recognized. There are four bonus tracks; “Chance of a Lifetime” was co-written with ex. URIAH HEEP man Pete Goalby and oozes of the eighties. “Machine” and “Red for Danger” are quite straightforward pop, but were covered by ROBERT PLANT.

Live in 85´ was Robin with a totally different band; guitarist Huey Lucas, who later on played with Adrian Smith in UNTOUCHABLES, bassist John Camp (RENAISSANCE), keyboard player Alan Nelson (who played with the Troy brothers in STRATUS), and drummer Kex Gorin (ex. MAGNUM). It is decisively more rocking with the opening pair of “Showdown” and “Shoot on Sight”. But “Spy” was a sign of things to come as it is disguised pop. The eighties at its best is displayed in “In the Night”, complete with a keyboard frame. There are quite a few similarities with MAGNUM actually, but without copying, as the guitars are strictly THIN LIZZY. “History” follows the pattern; the opening sequence was probably brought in by Kex as it has a very distinct MAGNUM touch. Towards the end the hits pile up; “Hitlist”, “Heartline”, “Dangerous Music” and “Go Down Fighting”. I would have been in a good mood that night too! Four bonus tracks here also, recorded either at Tommy Vance´s Friday Rock Show or by the BBC at the Paris Theatre. They might not feel as personal and sweaty as the fist twelve tracks, but the sound quality is better.

All in all Robin´s guitar is ubiquitous. He sings softly and has gone softer/into pop more and more over the years. I am almost totally convinced that this will become my personal favourite style as the years go by.

http://www.festivalphoto.net

Wow, what a line up this is! On Damage Control's second album we have guitar hero Robin George; UFO & Waysted bass legend Pete Way; and former Uriah Heep, AC/DC, Asia, Manfred Mann’s Earth Band, and The Firm drummer Chris Slade.
Together they form a self confessed "unholy trinity" brought to life by the need to whip up some of the best, full on, "in your face", uncomplicated rock I have heard in many a misspent night.

Putting their album
Raw into your CD player is like lighting the blue touch paper and not having the sense to retreat back to a safe distance. This is everything the album title suggests with Damage Control living up to their promise of serving up some “cruel, hard, and brutal”, yet “fun” rock.

The pedigree is self evident and their instinctive understanding gels like some dangerous concoction. It smokes, it fizzes, it smolders and it’s in danger of setting the place alight. It’s gritty, it’s raunchy, and it’s downright dirty. It’s full of sleazy riffs. It’s
Raw, and it’s right up my street!

Okay, let’s talk about that pedigree. In 1985 Robin George released an excellent solo album called
Dangerous Music. It fulfilled much of that potential that would see him working with the likes of David Byron, Phil Lynott, and John Wetton. He even recorded separate projects with Glenn Hughes and Robert Plant both of which were destined to remain unreleased for many years.

Robin’s career also saw the release of the superb
Rock Of Ageists album and a growing reputation as a producer working with Diamond Head, Witchfinder General, and (here’s the connection) UFO bass player Pete Way’s band Waysted.
Wayward Way was, and is once again, the mainstay bassist in UFO the band he left to form Fastway with ex Motorhead guitarist ‘Fast’ Eddie Clarke. Then came a spell with Ozzy Osbourne before he finally reunited with UFO.

This isn’t Damage Control’s first album. In 2006 they released their self-titled debut which featured the
Quireboys' own Spike on vocals. Now with Raw they set about recording something that “did not have a single effect on the whole album, no echo, no reverbs, no aural embellishments whatsoever”.

So
Raw was born. It hits all the targets with a relentless stomp of quality British hard rock riffs that has the vocals covered this time by Robin and Pete. This pairing comes together brilliantly on “Bitchin’ Blues” which sees Robin take the chorus from Pete’s verses.
“Slaughtered” comes with a large slice of country blues. It's sung by Robin and includes the great line, “I like a lot of whiskey with my water.”

Meanwhile, the track “Damage Control” has one of those aforementioned down and dirty riffs. The sleazy blues of “Victim”, leads nicely into the sultry smolder that is “Seven Golden Daffodils”.

Other highlights include the seductive opener “Raw”, the infectious pairing of “Alice” and “Savage Song.” The grinding “One Step Closer” just demands to be replayed time and again. “Selfish” teases us down, as does the excellent stand out “Redundant”, both of which radiate all the raw quality that you could ever want.

This band is a three headed monster that seizes you by the throat and throttles you into submission. With a line-up like this, and the understanding they have,
Raw just cannot fail to produce something attention grabbing.

Jeff Perkins  EuroRock

David Byron Band: On The Rocks
There's a certain irony in naming an album
On The Rocks whose star was in the depths of alcoholism during its making and reliant on the organisational capabilities of friend, collaborator and workaholic, Robin George. Written over a year in David Byron's studio at his Surrey mansion, this album was a fraternal labour with contributions from musicians known to the songwriting pair, eventually forming the David Byron Band as heard here and the later '83 release
Lost and Found. Bad Girl got its first airing among the 8 tracks of the original vinyl On The Rocks, recorded between two studios in England and Scotland and the extra 3 on this CD from the later of those sessions with drummer Stevie Bray replacing John Shearer. Once again Robin George has given it some 21st century polish at his Spanish Damage Control Music Studios. Byron's solo journey, post Uriah Heap, starts here but only reaches Lost And Found before Byron's untimely death in '85.

Sound quality avoids the excess polish of most 80s rock productions. There's an odd muted quality to the sound of Byron's voice on the opener Rebecca, however his voice still demonstrates its power, beginning to wane on his later recordings. The dynamics are all there in Bad Girl, a classic subtle rock build up to vocal and guitar (Robin George again) fireworks. There's enough 70s rock style on the whole album to keep anyone happy who enjoyed Bob Ezrin productions (70s Alice Cooper, Lou Reed, Kiss etc).

The surprise that makes this a keeper is the funky feel that keeps the pace way upbeat of heavy 80s ponderosity, although the most upbeat Never Say Die is in the wrong place and doesn't fit. The following track has enough diversity of musical influence combined with adolescent lyrics to stand up with any of the rock greats and this is the perfect album for tennis racket air guitarists.

Formed in 2006, Damage Control were put together by three veterans of the UK Hard Rock scene, namely vocalist / guitarist Robin George (solo artist, Phil Lynott, David Byron, Magnum), bassist Pete Way (UFO, Waysted) and drummer Chris Slade (Asia, AC/DC, Uriah Heep). Raw marked the trio's debut album and now receives a re-release via specialist label Angel Air, whose catalogue boasts a treasure trove of long forgotten gems. The songs here are slick and melodic with their roots heavily in the blues rock scene of the 70's where all three first plied their trade. George delivers some polished solos and riffs and his earthy vocal delivery perfectly suits the vibe with Way and Slade laying down a solid groove and they strike a good balance between up-tempo rockers, ballads and moody blues tunes of which "One Step Closer" provides a real highlight.

A second album from Damage Control remains a possibility albeit Pete Way's recent health problems may prevent this from happening in the near future. As it is we are left with this debut effort to enjoy a solid blues-based hard rock album from these illustrious musicians. This was an album that was released too little fanfare when it first appeared but is worthy of re-appreciation and the three really gel to give a tantalising glimpse of the potential therein.

 Sea of Tranquility

The last hurray from the former URIAH HEEP front man disproves the "spent force" myth in fine style.

Rock music and drink go hand in hand but in the case of David Byron they went too far. Thrown out of the band he threw his lot with in 1969, the singer didn't succeed solo and with a group he created with Clem Clempson, ROUGH DIAMOND. Maybe it was because Byron's pipes needed a special composer, someone like Ken Hensley, to shape up the songs where David could deliver in his flamboyant style. And he found such foil in another guitarist, the young Robin George, also a skilful producer.

This capacity of George helped him solidify the warbler's performance for the NWBHM era and filled their output with big infectious riffs and choruses which zip the skin from the boogie of "Rebecca", scratch it deliciously with the groovily romantic "Piece Of My Love", the most HEEP-ey track on offer, and release the catch only with the silky closer, "Little By Little". Little by little is the way this album works: it swishes superficially past you on the first spin and makes your feet tap relentlessly on the third one, Mel Collins' sax easing the slide in and out with soul inflections. But David's voice has it all too in the Philly funk of "Start Believing" and the "Bad Girl" blues where Robin lays down the Chicago groove. Then, there's the raging "How Do You Sleep?" that switches between the grit and caress and shows the full power of the band, as does "Safety In Numbers", one of the bonus cuts recorded for the second album. It never materialized, though: on the rocks in all senses of the expression, in a few years, David Byron was dead and gone.

Damage Control is a UK based band formed in 2006, consisting of veteran drummer Chris Slade (Manfred Mann's Earth Band, Asia, AC/DC, The Firm, Uriah Heep, + quite a few others), veteran bass player Pete Way (Ufo, Waysted), English AOR musician Robin George and former Quireboys vocalist Spike. They released their debut album in 2007, and since then vocalist Spike has left the band, and they have decided to continue as a trio with Way and George taking over vocals. "Raw" is basically a remake of their self-titled debut album, with 10 tracks from that one and two new compositions recorded with the band as a trio.

Musically we're talking blues influenced rock on this release. The album kicks off with a trio of hard rock tunes with noticeable blues influences, and then steadily evolves towards a more purified blues rock style until the album ends with the gritty, slide guitar dominated tune "Bitching Blues". People with more experience of the genre than me can probably point to influences left and right here, personally I only identified one; ZZ Top as they sounded in the early 70's. Not an all tunes, but three tunes in particular would not have been out of place on an album by Texas' finest; namely "Damage Control", "One Step Closer" and the aforementioned "Bitching Blues".

The opening hard rock tunes do set this release apart from others in the blues rock field to some extent, but more importantly the guitar sound of Robin George; highly distorted and fuzzy, still slick, distinct and very melodic, creates a trademark sound for this band. Slade is an experienced drummer, and utilizes his skill and experience cleverly here to create driving and interesting rhythms as the backbone for these tunes, and Pete Way does a swell job here too.
The songs as such are a tad varied in quality as I hear them though. Especially the more heavily blues influenced tracks to become a tad anonymous. It takes great skill to make something sounding interesting in a style that has been explored for so many years by so vast amounts of artists, and although never bad these many tunes doesn't shine very brightly either, with "Seven Golden Daffodils" and "Bitching Blues" notable exceptions.

"Alice" is my top pick from this release though, a slick tune with nice grooves and a very catchy chorus. Opening tune "Raw" and "Savage Song" are other strong tunes worth checking out.

Fans of blues based hard rock and blues rock will probably love this release, and I feel quite safe in recommending this release to fans of these types of music.

Rating: 7,5 (out of 10) Reviewer: Olav Björnsen copyright
www.prog4you.com
DAMAGE CONTROL 'Raw' Angel Air (2009) www.angelair.co.uk

This is a total reworking of an album released back in 2007 which featured Spike of the Quireboys on vocals. For this album the musicians remain with Robin George and UFO/Waysted's Pete Way handling the vocals and Chris Slade (Uriah Heep/Asia/AC/DC) on drums. The classic power trio format.

The production is as the album title suggests raw and live sounding. Interesting idea to record the same album in two different styles and having enjoyed both, this one just pips it for me as Spike's vocals didn't always seem to fit well with the music. Highlights? The awesome slide blues playing on 'Bitchin' Blues' and for more hard rocking blues try the title track. 'Seven Golden Daffodils' is the single on the album lending itself to airplay. 'Spy' from Robin George's excellent solo album 'Heartline' gets a radical makeover as well, dropping the acoustic feel for a rawer sound. Not a song I took to staright away as I enjoyed the original so much but given a few plays it clicks with the listener.

This has been available through Robin George's website but full marks to Angel Air for giving it a full release. High quality blues rock and no mistake. With any luck this will lead to some live shows and a second album.   **** Jason Ritchie
       News & Reviews Editor Get Ready To Rock!

Damage Control - RAW
Pete Way
Robin George
Chris Slade

Reviewed for RockFann by Vivienne Lennard

If you can only buy 1 record this year then let this be the one because it’s got it all.

Raw is an album bursting with Savage Songs protesting against injustice and corruption, attacking mediocrity and complacency with the sheer driving force of the music and the razor sharp wit of the lyrics.  These are songs ripped straight from the hearts of guys who seem to have been to hell and back, all fused together by the power trio’s incandescent rocking and raging.

Nothing and no-one who deserves it escapes criticism here; the individual (Raw and Selfish), society (Alice) or governments (Spy). There ain’t no love songs here except Victim, Pete Way’s Ode to the drug which becomes a heartfelt lament for victims of drug abuse with the heart rending words Robin George sings ‘straight from the heart’, originally inspired by Phil Lynott, with whom he was writing for the re-formed Thin Lizzy,just before Phil’s untimely death . The track Damage Control seems to be Way’s cry for help, rasped out with raw emotion by a damaged man and answered by George’s controlled, melodic sensibilities.

 Not that these songs lack a sense of humour; check out bluesy numbers like Slaughtered and Bitchin’ Blues while One Step Closer is a fabulous cry for freedom and then there’s  Seven Golden Daffodils, a captivating song you’d never expect to hear on an album this dark .

Throughout, the outrageously catchy riffs are powered along by the rock-solid yet melodic drumming of Chris Slade, Way’s throbbing bass and George’s  dramatic ,innovative guitar playing. The combination of George’s Lennon/Bolan-esque, bluesy vocals and Way’s emotion fuelled rocking are a powerful cocktail sure to send your head reeling. Turn it up real loud and roar!

Raw review courtesy of 'Dmitry M. Epstein'   http://dmme.net
The unholy trinity of hard rock geezers try to reign in their inner animal and gloriously fail.
To call it a power trio would be an underestimation of these veterans' synergy. In their free time the UFO's bassist Pete, drummer Chris Slade mostly recognisable from his AC/DC stint and
Robin George who played guitar for Phil Lynott and David Byron pooled their talents to have fun and get away with it. The abusive self-criticism peaking in the "Damage Control" boogie groove, there's no mercy in their deliciously rough music where the subtlety is well hidden behind the stringers' voices and the dark humor, with the "There ain't no Alice here, this ain't no wonderland" line to sum it all up. Well, some more adventurousness spiced up with the "Nightingales And Bombers" kind of drumming would be welcome, but the acoustic texture of grungey "Savage Song" brings about enough buzz, and "Selfish" is one of the most tremulous ballads out there with an exquisite, almost flamenco lace woven into its blues fabric. More so, "Slaughtered" is shaped as a fine slab of country blues, while "Spy" comes as an excercise of cramming as much initialisms in a song as possible - talk about all things lyrical and dirty, then.

Somewhat purer takes on some of these tracks have found their way onto the "Radio 1" EP - now added to "Raw" - with the almost chamber "Spy" sitting snugly alongside "Damage Control", funked-up and shot through with an acoustic thread, and some new songs which are too good to have been omitted yet not so bright to go to the second album that may see the threesome managing their anger ever effectively.

****4/5

Jake Webb        

LovePower and Peace
by
ViX and Robin George

ViX LovePower and Peace review courtesy of Tristram Valentine - RockFann Magazine

 ‘LovePower and Peace’ by Vix (x Fuzzbox).
Is this the rebirth of Vix under the wing of veteran rocker/producer Robin George?

Under Robin’s guidance the full vocal scope of Vix has been exposed at long last, with rock guitar and up-tempo riffs this album delivers from the title track, ‘LovePower and Peace’ all the way through to the final track, ‘World’
A great collaboration between two  cool artists.  Keep it coming, guys! Pop Rock at its best.

Review by Tristram Valentine, Sub-Editor for Rock Fann

Damage Control - RAW
Pete Way
Robin George
Chris Slade

Is this a master class in Rock n’ Roll? In poker 3 Aces are a winning hand but in the world of Rock 3 Aces are Damage Control.

3 Grand Masters plying their trade as only they know how. For people who enjoy their Rock  in all styles, this is a must have album!


Review by Tristram Valentine Sub-Editor for RockFann.

what the rest are saying..........................

Robin George
is that rare thing amongst rock musicians – jack of all trades and remarkably adept at all of them.... His latest album, ‘Crying Diamonds’, is a finely crafted collection of modern hard rock songs that perfectly highlights Robin’s ability as a songsmith. The title track itself is of particular interest, having been written with Thin Lizzy’s frontman Phillip Lynott just prior to his untimely death  Geoff Gillespie - Majestic Rock Records

Stories about Pete are legion and legend. This is a man who once toured Europe with Waysted sans a passport - in the days before the borders were opened up. All he had was a Waysted album sleeve and a tour itinerary. Did he get away with it? This is Pete Way...of course he did. And that's just the tip of the mythic iceberg. The difference between these tall tales and those told about other rock icons is that, in Pete's case, they're all true. Yet, there's more to Pete Way than a chortle, chuckle and a chianti or three (well, any booze will do). He's also found time to record some of the most essential music in rock history, with UFO and Waysted.  Malcolm Dome - radio broadcaster, author and journalist

One of the greatest drummers in rock history Greg Douglas - guitarist and vocalist with The Steve Miller Band

Bluesongs - superb compositions, beautifully arranged and very well produced. It’s good music for Christ’s sakes. One of the best things that I have heard so far this year, it will probably take something really earth stopping to top this off my list. One of the finest AOR releases by a true veteran. Bluesongs Review - Metal Invader

Pete is without doubt one of the most influential musicians to come out of the British rock scene in the 1970s and his distinctive style of bass-playing has inspired many rockstars. Bands including Twisted Sister, Quiet Riot and Def Leppard cite him as an influence. Steve Harris of Iron Maiden practically worships him!  Garry Bushell - journalist, author and television presenter

Slade was the best musician in AC/DC Angus Young of AC/DC no less

George’s writing and vocal styles are easily recognised, and the album includes ‘Crying Diamonds’, a song George wrote late on with Phil Lynott. The lyrics – “Secret handshake, old school tie brigade/Behind the scenery, I’ve read the book/I saw the film, but now I see reality” – may even reflect the way the industry slammed the door so prematurely shut on Lynott’s career. Fascinating stuff. Dave Ling's review of Crying Diamonds - Classic Rock Magazine

Robin has a refined and witty sensibility, similar to that of John Wetton. This album, however, is very different to his usual output. Blues, country and boogie rock n' roll are all in complete harmony, and he skillfully takes in a duet with a female vocalist on "World". The record has a number of light pop tunes, and what really impresses me about this album is the warm and friendly nature of the recording. Yasuhito Kitai - Burrn Magazine

An Earth Band without Chris Slade would be like a bird without wings
Barry Winton - journalist for Record Collector magazine

'Bluesongs' is business as usual for the man who almost single handedly ushered in the age of techno AOR with 1985's seminal 'Dangerous Music'. It's a wickedly fine set of mature pop-rock songs, well crafted, superbly played and extremely well produced. In 2004, melodic rock doesn't get a whole lot better than this! Times may change, but Robin George is still a force to be reckoned with…and 'Bluesongs' is the proof of that!

Keep that man away from my husband! He's a bad influence on Ozzy!


First of all I got to say this features some great production work. Crystal clear, nice bass and every track rings true Brit quality.
Get this cd and play it loud this summer.
Kerrang

The veteran rockers have pulled together an incredibly bluesy rock workout that doesn’t stop growing on you until the lyric booklet has become one with your skin. Rock Something

Robin George
ditches his more polished guitar sound of his solo work for some mean, dirty riffing and a great piece of guitar on ‘Bitching Blues’. Chris Slade’s drumming is worthy of a special mention as well as he really power along the songs and seems to get more free reign for powerhouse drumming then in his Asia days. Jason Richie

Damage Control is the brainchild of a couple of stalwarts of the British rock music scene – Pete Way and Robin George, who have both been banging out top quality albums since way back when. For this latest excursion, they have added ex- AC/DC drummer Chris Slade

The songs are an eclectic mix of rockers, bluesy numbers and high-quality slower tracks. The quality of song writing and lyrics is absolutely superb throughout. 

“Raw” and “One Step Closer” show the quality and variety in Robin George’s song writing in particular, the first an up-tempo rocker and the second a laid-back bluesy number. Both excellent, but completely different in style. 

“Redundant” is the track that is still going round in my head after two plays and may well be my favourite of the whole album. It’s just beautifully written, catchy as hell

Damage Control is British rock at its finest. Intelligent lyrics, superbly crafted songs, great performances by every musician…
Paul Williams

An Earth Band without Chris Slade would be like a bird without wings Barry Winton - journalist for Record Collector magazine

'Bluesongs' is business as usual for the man who almost single handedly ushered in the age of techno AOR with 1985's seminal 'Dangerous Music'. It's a wickedly fine set of mature pop-rock songs, well crafted, superbly played and extremely well produced. In 2004, melodic rock doesn't get a whole lot better than this! Times may change, but Robin George is still a force to be reckoned with…and 'Bluesongs' is the proof of that!

Keep that man away from my husband! He's a bad influence on Ozzy!


First of all I got to say this features some great production work. Crystal clear, nice bass and every track rings true Brit quality.
Get this cd and play it loud this summer.
Kerrang

The veteran rockers have pulled together an incredibly bluesy rock workout that doesn’t stop growing on you until the lyric booklet has become one with your skin. Rock Something

Robin George
ditches his more polished guitar sound of his solo work for some mean, dirty riffing and a great piece of guitar on ‘Bitching Blues’. Chris Slade’s drumming is worthy of a special mention as well as he really power along the songs and seems to get more free reign for powerhouse drumming then in his Asia days. Jason Richie

Damage Control is the brainchild of a couple of stalwarts of the British rock music scene – Pete Way and Robin George, who have both been banging out top quality albums since way back when. For this latest excursion, they have added ex- AC/DC drummer Chris Slade

The songs are an eclectic mix of rockers, bluesy numbers and high-quality slower tracks. The quality of song writing and lyrics is absolutely superb throughout. 

“Raw” and “One Step Closer” show the quality and variety in Robin George’s song writing in particular, the first an up-tempo rocker and the second a laid-back bluesy number. Both excellent, but completely different in style. 

“Redundant” is the track that is still going round in my head after two plays and may well be my favourite of the whole album. It’s just beautifully written, catchy as hell

Damage Control is British rock at its finest. Intelligent lyrics, superbly crafted songs, great performances by every musician…
Paul Williams